– [Destin] What is this? – Apollo 11, the first mission. – [Destin] This is Apollo 11? – [Andrea] The first mission,
these are the samples, all the samples that were brought back from the Apollo 11 mission. – [Destin] Is it still awesome for you? – It’s awesome, yes. – [Destin] It’s very awesome. – Only place in the world that you can actually work with moon rocks every day, with the amount
of samples that we do. – That’s amazing. (beeps) Hey it’s me Destin, welcome
back to Smarter Every Day, I’ve always wanted to do this intro. So, four years ago I had
the tremendous opportunity of going to Johnson Space Center to the Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility. Basically it’s as close as you can be to going to the moon on Earth. [Astronaut transmissions] When the astronauts got off of the lander, one of their main jobs was
to collect rocks, right? Now I’ve always though they would just gather these rocks and
get ’em back on the lander real quick ’cause they had a
limited amount of time, oh no. They had to approach a
specific rock, a specific way and capture it in such a way that we could study it decades later. Today on Smarter Every Day we’re gonna go to the facility on the Earth where they keep the moon rocks. Where the process ’em,
where they cut ’em up and give some pieces to
museums and universities, it is an awesome facility. So we’re gonna go meet one of my favorite people
on the planet: Andrea, she’s the director of the facility, we’re gonna go see what they
do with moon rocks today. Hey it’s me Destin, welcome
back to Smarter Every Day, we are at Johnson Space Center and we are about to go
see real moon rocks. But first, we have to get
the camera cleaned off. So why are you cleaning it? – [Woman] To get any kind of
outside particles, dirt, off. You’re going into a clean room. – Got it, so we’re gonna bunny suit up. – [Woman] Yes sir. – And so you’re putting booties on that have not been exposed
to dirt or anything, so now you’re in the clean area. And as we go back. – [Destin] It gets
progressively more clean? – Exactly.
– I see, okay. – And the rooms are pressurized
so that they clean air flows outwards, so that
the dirty does not. Like this door is open. – Air is flowing that way. This takes a while.
(chuckling) All right, I hope I don’t
have to pee during this. – I hope you do. (laughing) So you’re one of the
only people in the world that get to operate with
moon rocks on a daily basis? – One of few, we have a special group here and that’s our task, daily we
work with the lunar samples. – [Destin] No no no, you’re
giving me the NASA voice. (laughing) I want the Andrea voice, I
don’t want the NASA voice. (coughing) (laughing) So every day, you get
to mess with moon rocks. – Yes, every day we work– – [Destin] Is it pretty cool? – It’s a cool thing, work
with the moon rocks every day, a special group of people
and that’s what we do. – That’s awesome.
(laughing) That was still the NASA voice. (laughing) So how long have you been doing this? – I’ve been doing this for 39 years, and I was just one when
I started working here. (laughing) – [Destin] So you’re 40. – That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. – That’s great, that’s awesome. This is who I wanna work
with here, this is good. – We’re gonna go into our air shower, and we stay in there for one minute and it’s laminal flow, so that– – [Destin] You have no idea how much– – The less clean area and the clean– – [Destin] You have no idea
how much I like laminar flow. You don’t even know, I can’t
even explain it to you. – Then you really love it?
– I do. So here we go. – Okay, here we go. And only four can go in here at a time, so one, two, three. – [Destin] No way, so the air. – That’s where they are now. – Is our minute up? – Yes.
– Our microwave’s done? – [Andrea] So watch your step down. – [Destin] I’m watching it, boom. Bam, wow, all right. – What’s your schedule,
how long are you here? [Destin] I’m on the moon as far as I’m concerned. (laughing) [Destin] So I don’t care how long this takes! So what are we doing now? – We’re in our Pristine Sample Lab. And so there were six
missions that went to the moon from 1969 to 1972, bringing
back 842 pounds of moon rocks, which is 382 kilograms. Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 and 17 and those samples are curated
here in this laboratory. In these nitrogen filled cabinets, a very pure type nitrogen gas. This is Apollo 17. So I’m going to pull off the gloves. This is a neoprene glove that was use and we can not touch the
sample with these gloves if they’re unbagged, but the samples that I’m gonna
show you are actually bagged. And later on I’m gonna let
you go into a cabinet as well, but there won’t be any
samples in that cabinet. [Destin] Gotcha. This is Apollo 17’s sample, the sample number 76315,89. So you know that this
sample has been broken at least into 89 pieces. – [Destin] This is how they’re indexed. – This is how they’re, yes, and this is how they’re
packaged for storage. – [Destin] You only touch
the moon rocks with tools that you’re holding with gloves, right? – If the moon rocks are open, then we only touch them
with Teflon, aluminum or stainless steel so
there would be tweezers or Teflon gloves, and this is a pair– – [Destin] Gloves over your gloves? – Gloves over the gloves. – Wow.
– Exactly. – [Destin] That’s amazing. You’re controlling the materials that actually touch the moon rocks. You said Teflon– – Aluminum, stainless steel. – So even if they see that
material on the sample when they’re analyzing it,
they just subtract it out ’cause they know that that’s what you’re manipulating it with, that makes sense. Finger, finger, finger, finger finger. – Grab, make a fist. – Grab, punch?
– Yes. Keep going, wiggle your
hand around… perfect! – Got it, got it. Okay? – One more.
– All right. Leaning how to grab and
touch lunar rocks, all right. We good, we’re in, we’re in. – Pull that tray really over there, you see the one with the top on? – Oh my goodness.
– Pull it toward you. – There’s no way I can get to that. – [Andrea] Yes you can, reach. – Okay, got it. – There’s no such thing as I can’t. – Excellent. – [Andrea] Okay, take the lid
off and sit it on the floor. – Me and you could hang out. – Okay, there’s a black
pedal on the floor. Push down the black pedal and look, it’s gonna go to zero, take your foot up. – Oh you just, got it. – You’re taring it out, now put one of those weights
gently on the balance. – This is a super-balance isn’t it? Gently on the balance. – You break it you bought it. I’m not gonna break it. – Okay that’s actually 100 gram weight. – Wow, down to the microgram. – [Andrea] And 100 gram
[Destin]-milligams
actually weighs 99.99974, but we have a plus or minus tolerance so it’s within the range. – I see. – If it was not within the range then we would have to stop right now, get a technician to tweak the balance, before we go any further. – [Destin] Good grief, so
uncertainty and accuracy– – Is important.
– Is super important. This lab serves as a kind of staging area. NASA uses it to provide lunar material to academia for study. But the lab itself is
supplied by the vault. When you walk into this room and you know that it contains some of the most precious
material on Earth, it’s an absolutely surreal experience. This is it? – This is the pristine sample vault, and all the samples are
actually still stored in nitrogen cabinets, also by mission. You can look up there
you can see the mission, just like, also by mission just like that. – [Destin] What is this? – Apollo 11, the first mission. – [Destin] This is Apollo 11? – [Andrea] The first mission, these are the samples, all the samples that were brought back
from the Apollo 11 mission. – [Destin] Is it still awesome for you? – It’s awesome, yes. – [Destin] So all the moon
rocks in the entire world, the major moon rocks, all of ’em are in this room. – Yes, starting with Apollo
11 over in the corner. That’s Apollo 12, these are
14’s, 15’s, 16’s and 17’s. – [Destin] That’s crazy. So why don’t we have it
in multiple locations? Like why aren’t half of ’em in
a mountain in Colorado? – There is another remote
facility that we have just in case Johnson
Space Center was destroyed, we have 15% of the samples stored in a remote location for storage. – [Destin] Somewhere else
is all you’re gonna tell me. – Somewhere else.
– Got it. That’s awesome! That’s why we call it “remote”.
(laughing) – [Destin] Thank you. – Each one of them have
a security seal on there, which mean that we have
inventoried every sample in those cabins and we
know our database has every sample, every container number, every sample weight,
and sample description in there for everything that’s in it. – [Destin] Wow, that’s crazy. So do you have a photographic
index of all of these? – Yes, we do.
– You do. – Yes.
– Wow. And so that’s how you go through
and select what you want. – You know the–
– Exactly. – Composition?
– Yes. We have a description of everything, all the rocks were described. This is a open tray, because
there’s no seal on it. – [Destin] I see. (tray bangs)
Is it heavy? – Yes it is.
– Okay. (laughs) – [Andrea] And there are
the Apollo 15 samples. – [Destin] That’s an
actual rock right there? – [Andrea] Yes it is. And the number is 15499,179. So it lets you know it’s been
broken at least 179 times. – [Destin] So it was a much bigger rock when you first got it.
– Yes, yes – [Destin] That’s amazing. That is pretty interesting, so how, is it a big deal when you
get to chip a big rock? – Yes it is, and actually
you’re gonna see the process when we go back into the lab. – Really?
– You’ll see a large sample that’s being worked on. – [Destin] Oh that’s awesome. When they brought ’em off the moon, did they have ’em in nitrogen
or anything on the way back? – They were in bags, they were not in nitrogen
they were sealed in bags, [Destin] oh I see– [Andrea] and different, yes. (mumbling) [Destin] Gotcha. Judy’s the expert on this – They took two of rock
boxes on every mission. – [Destin] Really? carved out of a single peice of Aluminum
alloy 775 and triple gaskets. Those were to be closed
on the moon in vacuum and remain in vacuum and for Apollo 11 and 12. They were opened in the vacuum. – No way! In my head it’s like they
got inside the ascent module and just threw rocks on the floor. I know that’s not how it happened but in my head, y’know
it’s like a pickup truck. – Some were sealed in the vacuum boxes on the surface of the moon, they weren’t opened ’til
they were opened here. -(beep) I don’t know why I’ve
never thought about this, but you can’t just pick
up a rock on the moon, throw it in the lander and
bring it back to Earth. Because by the time you get in the lander, the oxygenated environment in the lander is going to change the chemical
composition of the rock as it oxidizes right? So how do you get rock back to Earth without Earth and the
atmosphere contaminating it? The answer is a super fancy box. They can put it in
there in bags of course, and then they can seal it up and get it all the way
back to Earth in a vacuum so it can still be studied today with the same chemical composition as it had on the moon. – [Neil Armstrong] We know that there are a lot of scientists from
a number of countries standing by see the lunar samples, and we thought you’d be interested in seeing that they really are here. These two boxes are the
sample return they are vacuum packed containers that were closed in the
vacuum on the lunar surface, sealed, and then brought inside the LM (Lunar Module) and put inside these fiberglass bags, zippered and resealed around the outside and placed in these receptacles in the side of the command module. – [Destin] I found a really
cool report from NASA that explained how the
processed the moon rocks from Apollo 11 and 12 in a vacuum. Turns out this was an incredibly difficult ordeal to figure out. According to this report
they had to basically make a reverse space suit, arms and everything. They developed special storage containers, tweezers, all kinds of things. But in the end reports say
that it made more sense to process the lunar material
under atmospheric pressure using dry nitrogen. – We had vacuum glove box It was not easy to maintain, y’know if you got any kind of leak you got stuff from outside inside and if you’ll notice these
are all positive pressure cabinets so it keeps the rocks clean. – [Destin] We went back to the lab and I got to witness Charice in the process of preparing a large moon
rock for a scientist. They team explained to
me how they gather tools they brought back more stuff
and so those boxes were full
They team explained to
me how they gather tools into the glove box without
contaminating the samples.
they brought back more stuff
and so those boxes were full and so the later missions
had extra bags and stuff
into the glove box without
contaminating the samples. Everything that enters the
presence of the moon rocks
and so the later missions
had extra bags and stuff has to be cleaned via a special procedure.
and so the later missions
had extra bags and stuff that were not in these sealed boxes,
has to be cleaned via a special procedure. Think about it, tools, nameplates, bags.
that were not in these sealed boxes, they came back in the crew cabin.
Think about it, tools, nameplates, bags. Think about it, tools, nameplates, bags. If any of these items are dirty they could become a
source of contamination. If it goes into that
cabinet with the rocks, it better be clean. Every tool, every nameplate,
everything that’s used to process the rocks
is cleaned to an insane specification and then it’s triple bagged. These bags are then removed in succession as the tools get closer and
closer to the moon rocks to avoid contamination at every step. For example here you can see me putting on a second set of gloves just
to touch the second bag, before placing this chipping
bowl into the air lock. So, I’m jus gonna turn this up? What flow rate do you want? – [Andrea] Just go to 100, 100 is good. Then you go purge for five minutes. – [Destin] Five minute purge? – [Andrea] Uh-huh. – [Destin] And so that’s
purging the airlock, which is there which is
where I put the tools.
[Andrea] Exactly. And you’re gonna reach and get the tools, or she’s gonna do that. – She’s gonna do it when she comes in, she’s gonna turn the
airlock off, the flow,
[Destin] Ok and then she’s gonna reach
in and pull in the tool. – [Destin] What are these I’m looking at? – [Andrea] Datapacks, which is
the history of every, every, this is what NASA tells us to do. We get curatory orders that
tell you exactly what to do and this was done in 1985, okay now these of course are, and the first thing I
told you we had to do was weigh the rock to make sure that the rock is within tolerance. So I did this back in 1985. – [Destin] Did you really?
You’re not that old. – I know, somebody forged this. (laughing)
Who did that? (laughing) And, this is the first thing you do. – [Destin] Okay– [Andrea] You take a picture of the
rock from whatever side you, this is the bottom face. Then you walk to the other
side, and you take the top face. That’s where you want the
saw to go right there, and it’s gonna come out right there. – [Destin] What kind of saw do you use? – Bandsaw, it’s the old (indisctinct) meat cutter that was modified
so it has a diamond edge blade so that no oil or lubricants is used, ’cause that would contaminate
the surface of the sample. We’ll show it to you, it’s right over in the other room, so. – [Destin] Cool, so you saw it? – [Andrea] Yes, and as you saw it, every time a piece break off you have to stop and take a picture. Now 15459,0 is the parent. Comma zero is the parent of every rock, but every time a piece
breaks off, you take a picture and give it a number. – Wow.
– Because as you’re going through, see how
those pieces are breaking? – [Destin] Oh so right here,
so you got the little pieces. – [Andrea] You got a whole
bunch of pieces breaking off. You gotta put it back together. – [Destin] Oh my goodness. – [Andrea] Like a puzzle. – [Destin] And then you also
have to figure out the– – [Andrea] You have to
know every number for it. – Really?
– Absolutely. Because see if you got
this little white piece off that number 254 [Destin] Right– years ago and now you wanna do
studies of the same bit and somebody has used it up, you can actually come
and find the other part that’s on 252 right there
of the same mineral. – [Destin] Good gracious. – So you have to know where
every sample came from. We know if a rock has been
broken up into 2000 pieces literally from looking at the pictures you could know exactly how
to put it back together and know where all the pieces came from. – [Destin] Take just a
second to think about how complex this problem is. Every single angle is photographed, some parts even down to
the microscopic level so you can put the
entire rock back together with nothing but
photographs and paperwork. One thing you’ll see
in most of these photos of the moon rocks is these
little cubes off to the side that I like to call letter dice. – [Andrea] The cube, north
south east west top bottom, you see the cubes just in there? The astronauts took pictures
of the sample on the moon and gave them orientation
and we keep that orientation. If we break and flip the
rock we flip the cube so that we’ll know exactly
where the sample was positioned in respect to the location on the moon, and I’m gonna show you a picture
of that in a few minutes. – [Destin] I would’ve never
thought to think about how important it was. [Andrea] the detail? – It’s very important
because you wanna know if it was exposed to cosmic
rays, solar wind, whatever. What was the depth? Was sitting
on the surface of the moon? Was it buried underneath something? All of that is important in the research that the PIs are doing. – These are not letter dice, which, if you say letter dice people will make fun of you won’t they? – They’re orientation cubes. – [Destin] Orientation cubes? – Yeah, I’m glad I know that now. – [Destin] Okay what do we
have, what are the letters? – So, y’know, north, south, east and west and then top and bottom. – Gotcha, okay, letter dice. (laughing) You’ve forgotten more about the moon than most people will
ever know, haven’t you? – (laughs) and I have forgotten… – [Destin] (laughs) That’s amazing . – And this is an Apollo 11 soil sample. – [Destin] Really? – You can hold this. – [Destin] I can hold it? I would love to hold that. – It’s Apollo 11 sample,
what’s the number? – [Destin] 10071– – Comma. – [Destin] Comma 11, but hold on there’s, you said it’s broken apart. – Yeah, this is comma 11
so there’s a comma 12, there’s a comma 15, there’s a comma 100, but this is once it gets
this number comma 11– – [Destin] So there was a sample and you just took some out and that’s those,
[Andrea] Yes. together are the sample. – Exactly.
– That’s amazing. – This is a returned sample so it actually has gone outside, because they did
their studies and analysis it could’ve been in one
piece when they got it and now it came back
broken into these pieces. But they still have to return the sample. – Andrea let me hold it. – They still have to. (laughs) – It’s in a bag, I don’t
care, I got to hold it. Thank you. I really appreciate that. Thank you for all your time,
ladies, it was amazing. I appreciate that. So, I’m Destin you’re
getting Smarter Every Day, have a good one. It was awesome. A huge thank you to Johnson Space Center for actually letting
me go into the facility where they store the moon rocks, I am very grateful thank you Gordon, thank you Andrea, it’s a huge deal. Also thanks to the US
Space and Rocket Center for letting me film on the moon. There’s two things you
can do if you want to, number one is you can subscribe to Smarter Every Day, if you’d like to, if you like this kinda thing. Number two is consider going to watch one of these videos from our friends. One is Joe Hanson from
It’s “Okay To Be Smart”, he talks about what we actually
learn from these rocks. And the other one is Brady Haran my buddy, he’s got a channel called “Objectvity”, he’s taught specifically
about the genesis rock which is a really cool rock that taught us a ton of stuff. I’m Destin, you’re
getting Smarter Every Day, have a good one, I will
now slow down my footage. (beep) (laughing) Does that work at all? (laughing)

Where does NASA keep the Moon Rocks? – Smarter Every Day 220
Tagged on:                                                                                                                                             

100 thoughts on “Where does NASA keep the Moon Rocks? – Smarter Every Day 220

  • July 9, 2019 at 7:07 pm
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    Andrea (the lab manager) is awesome.

    I must confess. Any "wingeing" you hear from Brady Haran about how long this collab took is 100% true. We filmed this 4 years ago (!). He's bugged me to publish it every two months or so, so as a way to express my sincere apology I'd like to humbly request that you go watch his video and consider subscribing on Objectivity. Also, if you do so, please leave a comment about how it was worth the wait and he should quit his wingeing. Here's his video. (I didn't know about the Genesis Rock!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvhLBzsDwSQ

    Also check out Joe Hanson's video! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qr28zMXQ3bU

    Reply
  • September 7, 2019 at 12:57 pm
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    Who said men does not land on MOON 🌙

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  • September 7, 2019 at 5:13 pm
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    She is cool and funny

    Reply
  • September 7, 2019 at 6:23 pm
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    but now they can 3d scan right?

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  • September 8, 2019 at 5:03 am
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    Where do they keep the petrified wood?

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  • September 8, 2019 at 5:25 pm
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    excellent video

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  • September 8, 2019 at 5:28 pm
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    those paper files should be computerized

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  • September 9, 2019 at 5:21 am
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    todavìa siguen con el cuento de la luna…….

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  • September 9, 2019 at 11:42 am
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    So, Judie talked about how the samples were placed in rock boxes that were triple sealed and closed while still in the vacuum of the moon and brought back to earth that way.

    I heard from somewhere (I don't remember where anymore) that the lunar dust was so rough and coarse that the seals had actually been damaged and air from the lunar lander and command module had actually touched the samples.

    Could anyone comment as to whether or not that actually happened? Maybe to only some samples? And if so, what was done to compensate for this atmospheric contamination when the samples are being studied?

    Reply
  • September 9, 2019 at 1:40 pm
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    I thought of something that really actually makes sense she probably probably looks a lot younger and is a lot healthier than someone that is usually her age because of working for so many years in such a clean environment 🧐🤓

    Reply
  • September 9, 2019 at 3:25 pm
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    Gloves on gloves on gloves! My girlfriend doesn’t even use that much protection!

    Reply
  • September 9, 2019 at 4:28 pm
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    Smarter Everyday makes me love life even more. Thank you Destin

    Reply
  • September 10, 2019 at 6:24 pm
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    the detail in cataloging each piece is mindblowing

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  • September 10, 2019 at 10:23 pm
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    Has any human ever held a
    Moon rock with their bare hands??

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  • September 11, 2019 at 5:26 pm
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    6:10 microgram 😂😂👍

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  • September 12, 2019 at 3:19 am
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    Why do these rocks need to be so protected they are just rocks

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  • September 12, 2019 at 6:49 am
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    Fake

    Reply
  • September 12, 2019 at 3:42 pm
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    That lab is a germophobe's wet dream.

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 10:47 am
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    Nice video.. Such facility to keep most precious metal on earth that's actually from outside earth.
    They really thought about future in 1970's

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 12:17 pm
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    Manhole cover at the base of the lander . lol !!!

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  • September 13, 2019 at 1:05 pm
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    11:28 that's how read pdfs in my device lol

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 9:00 pm
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    She doesnt even know that those rocks are from earth as always the us lies to everybody they never landed on the moon its all fake

    Reply
  • September 14, 2019 at 5:03 am
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    I Love This… So Much!!!!!!

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  • September 14, 2019 at 9:33 am
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    This is an amazing scientific process to preserve these moon rocks. By the way, I don’t think NASA is the only agency to bring moon rocks back. Soviets did bring some grams too with Luna series.

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  • September 15, 2019 at 3:07 pm
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    i watch the whole commercials because i support your channel 🙂

    Reply
  • September 16, 2019 at 5:24 am
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    Cool video!

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  • September 16, 2019 at 5:47 am
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    I love how nearly all the lab staff are women! Go girls in STEM!!

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  • September 16, 2019 at 8:21 am
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    Hi ,I am NASA scientist and very happy to see you people here

    Reply
  • September 16, 2019 at 3:29 pm
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    More tax dollars pissed away on uselessness.

    Reply
  • September 16, 2019 at 9:56 pm
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    Fake bs

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 6:12 am
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    Not in a million years would I have thought about the level of detail and control involved in the processing of these samples. Very cool.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:47 am
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    poor old destin .. he SOOOO believes in all of this. If I were him, I'd sue NASA for making him look dumber everyday

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:32 am
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    Awesome video, thank you!

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:38 am
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    moon stone ladies thanks

    Reply
  • September 19, 2019 at 12:38 pm
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    NASA is just a bunch of jokers.. everything is fake. These people even don't know the gowning procedure of sterile room. They are just faking all the things

    Reply
  • September 20, 2019 at 3:38 pm
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    I'm thrilled by every single video you post, I'm honestly watching more and more and telling my friends. Thanks for all of the knowledge!

    Reply
  • September 21, 2019 at 6:31 am
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    The lady Andrea was lovely..

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  • September 22, 2019 at 9:24 am
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    It's difficult not to be romantic about science and space.
    Fantastic people!

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 5:55 am
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    Wow…the lengths they'll go to. Smh & LoL

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 6:18 am
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    Space may be the final frontier but it's made in a Hollywood basement.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 4:43 am
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    0:35 yeah that’s pretty much how they “landed” on the moon

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  • September 24, 2019 at 11:53 pm
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    Never thought I’d be interested in this, but that is honestly so amazing. Thanks for posting this!

    Reply
  • September 25, 2019 at 12:13 am
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    1:33
    Camera: Gets cleaned
    Destin: Do it again with this second one

    Reply
  • September 25, 2019 at 1:50 am
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    Green cheese not confirmed!

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  • September 25, 2019 at 2:26 pm
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    That’s petrified wood, not moon rocks

    Stop lying to the kids

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  • September 26, 2019 at 12:02 pm
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    lol Micro Gram

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  • September 27, 2019 at 7:13 pm
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    How do you think she would feel if she was to learn after 39 years that those moon rocks never came from the Moon? I think you could show her unlimited amounts of evidence and she still would never believe it. but that goes for about anybody that has been indoctrinated with what they know to be fact their whole life. When beliefs are challenged, it makes the brain glitch.

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 9:02 pm
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    Hey, Destin stop talking and let us hear more about the theories and experiences the people working in Apollo have. This is the reason why I follow the pages of those two "friends" you mentioned of yours at the end of this video but I don't follow you channel.

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 10:00 pm
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    Question…If the moon was once a part of planet earth, broken off after being hit by some space object…why are the rocks sooo special. After all they are only earth rocks as well.

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 10:27 pm
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    I'm getting Venom vibes from this lab. Why do you need gloves over gloves 😂🤔

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:17 pm
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    Where does Nasa keep telemetry data?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 5:03 pm
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    I have been doing it for 39 yrs.. and I was 1 wen I started doing it… 😂
    I love her.

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 5:58 pm
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    Destiny's energy is always so intense and I absolutely love it. Keep up the awesome work!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 6:30 pm
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    This is so cool

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  • September 30, 2019 at 6:16 am
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    Fake news we never went to the moon.

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  • September 30, 2019 at 11:58 am
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    I seen ? Nevermind I see it now

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  • September 30, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    0:31 this is probably the place were they faked the landing

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  • September 30, 2019 at 6:54 pm
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    Very good video! The amount of traceability is staggering! Thanks to all for this insight!! I keep getting smarter every day 🙂

    I wonder how they deal with the possibly contaminated samples that come back from studies.

    Reply
  • September 30, 2019 at 10:03 pm
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    0:11 sounds like willy wonka bit with moonrocks

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  • October 1, 2019 at 6:33 am
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    Why don't you have any from Apollo thirte— ohhh…

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  • October 1, 2019 at 10:31 pm
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    looking at the size and ID number , are we running out of moon rock??

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  • October 2, 2019 at 4:12 am
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    0:39 they saw a drain next to them.

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  • October 2, 2019 at 5:04 am
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    Hilariously fake

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  • October 2, 2019 at 10:31 pm
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    Moons Haunted

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  • October 3, 2019 at 9:47 pm
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    Lol can’t touch the sample with gloves with out bags. The guys picked them up with or with out bags n gloves back in the day haha

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  • October 4, 2019 at 12:21 am
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    My teacher had authentic moon rocks. He got them from his friend who is a scientist at NASA and my teacher had to walk around with a suitcase attached to his wrist with handcuffs.

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  • October 4, 2019 at 2:22 am
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    Mn

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  • October 4, 2019 at 6:43 am
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    Lmao fake moon rocks

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  • October 5, 2019 at 7:52 am
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    Destin you've been bamboozled. I can't watch any more of your videos. Up until the NASA garbage, your videos were entertaining.

    Reply
  • October 5, 2019 at 5:20 pm
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    now you got me curious, tell us the chemical and mineral composition of them thar stones.

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  • October 6, 2019 at 4:18 am
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    Look it’s were they faked the moon landing.

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  • October 6, 2019 at 2:40 pm
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    Seriously? Why does it or will it ever matter about the exact location where collected, and how the sample was oriented at that location., Or what piece of rock fits another piece of the same rock. Decades of wasted taxpayer dollars, while people are starving to death on our own rock. This is a shameless sin being committed against humanity.

    Reply
  • October 7, 2019 at 3:50 pm
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    I still wonder if man actually went to moon.

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  • October 7, 2019 at 8:39 pm
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    NASA is fake. I feel dumber after watching this.

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  • October 8, 2019 at 7:52 am
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    I wonder if we get the same kind of precision and accuracy when the ET’s are studying us?

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  • October 8, 2019 at 9:45 pm
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    That was COOL!! Even cooler was you posted it on my birthday.

    Reply
  • October 8, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Andrea was on we are going on nasa YouTube channel

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  • October 9, 2019 at 2:20 pm
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    hollywood basement

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  • October 9, 2019 at 6:08 pm
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    this was destins last video, as he then stopped his youtube channel to look at moon rocks with andrea at a daily basis

    Reply
  • October 9, 2019 at 11:53 pm
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    It's been over 50 years… what about the rocks that we havent learned that requires all those procedures? I'm not a braindead sheeple conspiracy theorist I'm asking for the official credited position as to why

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  • October 10, 2019 at 6:34 am
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    That some comeplex LEGO

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  • October 10, 2019 at 4:41 pm
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    All the dislikes from flat earthers🐵

    Reply
  • October 12, 2019 at 3:32 am
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    Oh I got some moon rocks of my own. 🌚🌚🌛🌜

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  • October 12, 2019 at 8:48 am
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    I’M HERE TO TAKE MY ROCKS.

    Reply
  • October 13, 2019 at 4:47 am
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    if nothing else, Americans know how to create a business out of nothing, from the biggest lie in the history of a flat earth !

    Reply
  • October 13, 2019 at 9:38 am
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    7:49 And that is what we should have found on Sep 20th.

    Thanks for the great content, keep doing what you are doing!

    Reply
  • October 14, 2019 at 12:35 am
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    Thank you for this video. This is, without a doubt, my favorite.

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  • October 14, 2019 at 2:12 am
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    LOL! man never set foot on earth! it was a big Hollywood hoax to bankrupt Soviets as Soviets kept wasting billions in space while their public nose dived into poverty. why can NASA go today with modern tech?

    Reply
  • October 14, 2019 at 2:47 pm
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    Fact! some of these "moon rocks" turned out to be nothing more than petrified wood from earth.

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  • October 14, 2019 at 8:21 pm
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    Did Russia & China get any of these samples?

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  • October 15, 2019 at 3:12 am
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    So I'm really not sure just how many people have noticed, but I fear the documentation aspects of this system.

    Just as a glance, Andrea (who seems amazing and would be really awesome to meet) just so happened to state "254" at 14:55 which 254 is noticeable at the left of the page.

    Could we start a discussion on how something like this could be resolved? Maybe label maker type system?
    Just wanna hear some thoughts.

    Reply
  • October 15, 2019 at 11:22 am
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    Ñeil
    Ãrmstrong
    $moke them
    Ãll….

    Reply
  • October 16, 2019 at 1:38 am
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    You want some moon rock, dude? I'll get ya some moon rock.

    Reply
  • October 16, 2019 at 3:26 am
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    I wonder how many dudes got fired from being DUDES, so only women are left at this job that requires precision caring 😀

    Reply
  • October 16, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    This is maybe my favorite. I m a soapstone carver. Most of my rocks are 5-750 pounds to start. My carvings are 6- .25#. I love how they catalog the slices and pieces. Stellar work

    Reply
  • October 16, 2019 at 1:21 pm
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    what if someone farted inside the room

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  • October 16, 2019 at 7:49 pm
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    NASA is nothing but lies.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 8:10 am
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    I have to evolve my Nidorino. Now I know where to go. Thanks Youtube

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 8:32 pm
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    Just wow cant believe

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 4:56 am
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    Yep those rock are from desert..

    Reply

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