Hello, and welcome to another episode of The 8-Bit Guy. So, today, I’m going to be doing another
computer restoration project. Now, I am well known for doing computer restorations
and most people assume that I know what I’m doing. And for the most part, I do. However, not today. Today I’m going to be working on an original
version 1 Tandy Color Computer. Now, this thing is in terrible physical condition. It does work, but it has seen much better
days. Now, the reason this is going to be a challenge
is because this is not the traditional style of restoration work that I’m used to doing. This is painted plastic. Believe it or not they used to paint plastic
computers back in the 1970s which is… This might be early eighties, I don’t know. Anyway, either way around, so retrobrite is
not going to help me out here. So I’m going to clean this thing up. And I have a sneaking suspicion I’m going
to wind up having to sand it down and repaint it. Which is something I’ve never done before. So, by the end of this video we may end up
having a lesson on what not to do. But either way around, I’ll learn something
and you’ll learn something whether I destroy it or hopefully it will come out looking good,
though. We’ll see! I don’t think I’ll be holding on to this
box, it’s in really bad and brittle condition. It says to save this to save this carton for
transit, but it’s not even in good enough shape for that. The Styrofoam instead is actually in decent
shape, though. OK, so one thing I should mention right away
is that this keyboard is actually not original. The first generation Color Computer came with
a chicklet keyboard that was notoriously terrible. So some people opted to replace it with this
aftermarket keyboard. And it’s a pretty decent keyboard with real
switches in it. If you look at the Radio Shack catalog for
1981, you can see what the original keyboard would have looked like here, and that the
4K version like this one was selling for $399, although you could get a 16K version as well
if you wanted to spend a little extra. I have no idea what this gunk is on top. Whatever it is, doesn’t want to come off. Down here, you can see the paint is totally
rubbed away where the bare plastic is showing underneath. I suspect this would have been from somebody’s
palm sitting there day after day like this. So this computer probably got quite a bit
of use. Up here you’ll notice it has the 4K RAM
badge, which means this is one of the very first that came out in the year 1980. The first thing I need to do is disassemble
this computer. One of the fist things I noticed when I pulled
the top off was this crazy wire for the top LED. This did not look like a factory wiring job. Yep, this was also aftermarket. In fact, I didn’t even realize at fist that
this model of computer doesn’t even have any sort of power indicator from the factory. And since they didn’t give any sort of disconnect,
I had to desolder this LED so that I could completely separate the top from the bottom. I also noticed this little spacer here. My guess is the original keyboard probably
sat there and with the aftermarket keyboard, they needed to fill the gap. I also noticed that the labels for the ports
on the rear were painted on and at this point they were nearly worn completely off. Here’s that LED up close. It actually fits well with the style of the
computer, I didn’t even notice that it was an add-on. But you can clearly see it is just a panel-mount
LED and somebody drilled a hole through the case and mounted it there. I decided the first thing I should do was
remove it, though. I thought that will make it easier to restore
this top piece. Next, I removed the 4K RAM badge. 4K was not a lot to brag about even in 1980. The main badge proved to be a little more
difficult to remove. The bottom is made of a thin layer of aluminum. So even once I got the corner free, I didn’t
want to just pull on it because I was afraid it would crease the metal. But I eventually worked it off with a screwdriver. It did end up bending it some, but I was able
to bend it back into shape. There was a lot of sticky goo on the bottom
of this thing, so my first line remedy for this is to use WD-40 and let it sit on there
a while. Whenever I clean a computer, my first line
product is glass cleaner such as Windex. In this case, I had doubts that it would help,
but I figured I should start there. It did take off a lot of that white powdery
looking stuff, but that was about it. I don’t think there’s anything that can
be done to make this paint look better, especially down here by the palmrest. The right side of the palmrest looks pretty
bad too, but not as bad as the left. All right, so alcohol is usually my second
go-to product when cleaning a computer. And after scrubbing for a little while, I
noticed it was making the top look a little better, but that’s because it was actually
taking the paint off. Since it was just a thin layer, it made it
look better. That might have actually worked well on the
entire computer, except the fact that so much of the paint was missing down here. In fact, when I scrubbed down here, all it
did was make it worse. The paint in this area was already so worn
that it was eager to come off. I turned my attention back tot he badge for
a moment. The goo was still not wanting to come off,
so I ended up giving it a second spray of WD-40 and put it aside for a while. As an experiment I wanted to see what baking
soda would do. I’ve had fantastic results with this on
some computers, but I’ve never tried it on paint before. I was sort of hoping it would would take a
layer of paint off and make it look better, sort of like when you use rubbing compound
on a cars. I actually even thought about using some car
products on this. Anyway, the baking soda was having no effect
here. Ok, so I decided to use oven cleaner. I’ve never used this before, but I read
online that it works well for removing paint. You might ask why I didn’t use paint thinner
or acetone. Well, either of those would have likely melted
or damaged the plastic. Apparently oven-cleaner won’t do that. At first I just tried spraying it on and wiping
it off. That seemed to remove a little paint, but
not much. So, I decided to try it again only let it
sit for 10 minutes first. The results were a little better, but not
much. So, I sprayed some more and decided to let
it sit for 30 minutes. In the meantime I turned my attention back
to this badge. I eventually realized the reason I couldn’t
get the adhesive off was that they used double-sided tape to hold ot on. Unfortunately, the tape wouldn’t peel off
in one go, but I worked at it for a while and managed to get it off. After 30 minutes, the paint seemed to be coming
off a little easier. It seems I was on the right path at last. So I coated the whole computer in this stuff
and let it sit for a while. After an hour it was sort of bubbled up, which
means the paint was coming off. I decided the best way to rinse this was with
the house outside. It was already raining anyway, so this definitely
wasn’t a good day for retrobrite. After letting it dry off, you can see the
paint was significantly deteriorated, but still seemed to be hanging on. I decided to give it another go and see if
it made any difference. OK, so after several more applications this
is kind of what we’re left with. It still hasn’t removed the paint completely. You can still see down here the original plastic
underneath and you know, if you look at this, I can just scrape this stuff away with my
fingernail, but there’s got to be an easier way to get the rest of this stuff off of the
system. I decided to try a brillo pad, which is made
of steel wool. I started on this area where the paint seemed
to be the weakest. And the good news is, it did work. So I got to work on the rest of the case,
although I had a feeling I was going to feel like the Karate Kid by the time I was done
with this thing. So here’s the result after rinsing. It made a lot of good progress on the palm
rest and up here. But the top is putting up more of a fight
than I expected. In the meantime, I went to the hardware store
to find some spray paint. I really had no idea what kind of paint would
work best, pretty much everything claims to work on plastic. My biggest concern is not so much whether
the paint will stick, as much as whether or not it will react with the oil from my skin. Many years ago before I knew about retrobrite,
I tried painting on old computer that had turned really yellow. At first it actually looked pretty good. But, after a very short time of using the
computer, everywhere that my palms had touched the palm rest, which was now paint, turned
a nasty shade of brown. And so I’ve never painted another computer
since. I ended up picking these two colors, and I
thought I’d test it out another piece of black plastic to see what they looked like. So, this is the lighter color of gray, and
then here’s the darker color. The dark gray is spot on, but the light gray
is a bit lighter than I expected. When comparing to the actual computer, the
light is a bit too light and the dark is a bit too dark. The original color is somewhere in between. However, I noticed when looking at this inside
lip of the plastic, where it’s never been exposed, the color is slightly lighter and
actually does tend to more closely match the lighter color paint. So I think I’ll go with that. In the meantime I thought I should clean up
the bottom half of the computer. It’s really not that bad, actually. It just has some dust collected on the bottom. I decided not to paint the bottom plastic
for the time being. I wanted to see how the top piece turned out
before I made up my mind. So I just vacuumed the dirt out of the bottom
and then proceeded to clean the keyboard. And even the keyboard was not really that
dirty, so rather than popping off all of the keys like I normally would, instead, I just
used another method that I’ve used many times in the past and works for mild cases
like this. Essentially I just use windex to clean off
the top of the keys, then I fold the wet paper towel in half and run it down the horizontal
spaces between the keys. For the vertical spaces I use a flat tipped
screwdriver to help run the wet paper towel between those keys. While we have it open, lets take a look at
this logic board. I see more of what appears to be some aftermarket
work done here. And, I’m pretty sure these RAM chips have
been upgraded from the originals. I suspect this machine has 32K now. Taking a close look, this is the Motorola
6809 CPU. This CPU was also used in the Dragon computers,
the Vectrex, and several arcade machines of the time. This is the 6847 Video Display Generator. This is the same video chip that was used
in the Dragon, Laser 200, Acorn Atom, and other machines too. Over here is the SAM which stands for Synchronous
Address Multiplexer. The easiest explanation is that it handles
memory addresses for the CPU and video chip. These two chips here are called P.I.A. and
they are essentially general input/output chips for things like the keyboard, joysticks,
etc. Up here we have two ROM chips, and down here
we have 32K of RAM, which was originally 4K in this model. This power cord is pretty nasty, and it has
a lot of paint or something on it. A lot of people don’t bother cleaning cords
but if they feel nasty, I have to clean them. And just so you can see how much dirt was
on this thing, take a look at my paper towel after a few seconds of cleaning this thing. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to get the
paint off easily so I’m not going to worry about that right now. I would probably replace the whole cable before
I spent too much time on that. This is the best way to store cables that
you care about, though. That way it doesn’t have any kinks in it. Alright, so I finally had the case down to
the bare plastic. It was time to start masking this thing off. But I found myself somewhat confused because
if you look at this area here, and then look at the original photos of the CoCo1 you’ll
see it was painted along with the rest of the case. But if you find a photo of the very early
models you can see this area was in fact not painted. So I got out my masking tape and started masking
off the black area. I had also thought about filling in the hole
where the LED was drilled out with some epoxy. But then I realized that this machine was
never going to be factory original again because of the after market keyboard and the RAM upgrade,
so I decided to leave the LED as well. I also needed to mask off this cartridge port
door, since it’s supposed to stay black. OK, so here comes the first coat of paint. I’m not very good at painting. And to make matters worse it was windy outside. I stayed far back from the computer, even
if it meant wasting a lot of paint and taking longer to get it done because my biggest fear
at this point was having a run, which looks really tacky. I actually ended up applying 3 coats about
30 minutes apart. And this is how it looked after the 3 coats. I also decided to follow this up with a clear
coat. I’m hoping that will help with the issue
I described before where my hands discolored the paint. I applied two coats of this stuff. OK, it was finally time to peel off the masking
tape and see how this was going to look. Not bad, actually. I decided to use double-sided tape to hold
on the badge, since that is how they did it from the factory. This stuff was actually just about the perfect
width for this badge. This one needs no tape since it is held in
mechanically. I also cleaned up this LED some since it had
that white powdery stuff on it. And there we have it. That actually looks quite good compared to
before. I actually kind of like the two tone look
of the plastic on the side now. In fact, take a look at this picture I took
before, and compare to how it looks now. OK, so it’s time to connect this thing up
and test it. Notice there are no labels on the back anymore. I might be able to fix that. I’ll also plug in a joystick. I have one of these annoying little joysticks. OK, let’s fire it up. And it works! Let’s check the RAM and see what it says. OK, so it reports back 24K for BASIC, but
I am still pretty sure it is a 32K machine. I’ll stick in a cartridge. I only have two games, and both of them are
pretty lame. But it’s all I have for the moment. This is some sort of maze game, but I haven’t
figure out exactly how to play it. The other game is a football game and I can’t
figure out how to play it either. I decided to use my label printer with these
special clear-backed labels as a replacement for the labeling on the ports on the rear
of the machine. And you know, it doesn’t look perfect, but
it turned out pretty good. This computer certainly looks a lot better
than it did, but it’s never going to look factory original. You know, that’s kind of one of the interesting
things about this computer. It kind of tells a story. Now, I have no idea who owned this computer
before, but it’s obvious whoever owned it was a serious CoCo user. And I don’t mean just for playing games,
because otherwise I don’t think they would have bothered to replace the keyboard, upgrade
the RAM, and add the LED, and the sheer fact that they had rubbed the plastic, the paint
off of the palmrest suggest they spent a lot of time typing on this computer. So, I’m kind of interested to know what
it could have been used for for that much. Someday, I wouldn’t mind coming back and
adding a composite video output to this. That’s probably the most useful hack you
could do to it today. Also, for those of you who are interested
in CoCo stuff, I’ve actually been collecting quite a bit of it lately because I’m hoping
to do a full episode devoted to the entire line of CoCo computers and hopefully you’ll
be seeing that later this year. In the meantime, stick around and thanks for
watching!

TRS-80 Color Computer 1 Restoration
Tagged on:                                                                                                                                     

100 thoughts on “TRS-80 Color Computer 1 Restoration

  • May 14, 2019 at 5:45 am
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    For painting, use a cardboard "house" around your projects. This allows the paint to drop and adhere better.

    Reply
  • May 16, 2019 at 8:03 pm
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    I dont know what it is about your voice but it's soothing to listen to you when I'm very tired. Computers and an ocassional cat also help.

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  • May 16, 2019 at 10:18 pm
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    You can buy paint stripper to make your job easier. It's a jelly like substance and you let it do it's thing. You wait for a short while then scrape it off with a sponge

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  • May 19, 2019 at 4:31 am
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    I hope you've switched from steel wool to plastic brushes for removing paint.

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  • May 22, 2019 at 9:24 pm
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    Back when 4K was for ram lol

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  • May 24, 2019 at 9:04 pm
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    That power cord residue is a dead give-away that the former owner was a smoker.

    Reply
  • May 25, 2019 at 2:27 am
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    There should be a way to differentiate 4K from Back in the day and 4K from now. Other than saying the full names.

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  • May 27, 2019 at 7:38 pm
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    I learned to write machine code on a Trash-80. We had several in my school computer room in 1978. My parents used to pick me up at 6pm or so on the way home from work, so after school, I used to go to the computer room and mess around on the TRS-80s. I wasn't actually enrolled in a computer class, but I did end up getting a report for computing: "Works well with a minimum of supervision, and good at optimising use of computer resources. However, he seems mainly interested in the entertainment capabilities of the machine. B+"

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  • May 28, 2019 at 10:34 am
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    My first 2 computers were Cocos! What was great about them was that you could specialize them so much. The joysticks took analog signals, so I'd do things like attach a CDS cell to them, or other potentiometers. The cartridge slot was pretty cool, too, and they made Eprom burners that you could use in them to make your own cartridges. There were at least three magazines devoted to it (Rainbow was my favorite) — and nearly all the hardware was eventually mapped by enthusiasts.

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  • May 29, 2019 at 5:06 pm
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    Hello from the future

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  • May 29, 2019 at 8:10 pm
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    Did anyone hear Mario in the background music?

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  • May 29, 2019 at 10:56 pm
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    Pulled out my old model 1 (bought it '81 I think) to check a drive I got on Ebay to replace one I loaned years ago. CoCo bad at boot. Alternating yellow block and "@" symbol columns on screen. Not a tech/EE. My tech. ref. manual had faded highlighting, I made so long ago I forgot, where I started troubleshooting. I wrote Conway's Life and a joystick level reader in assembly, and made and programmed in Basic a 3-axis cylindrical digitizer that worked, but I never found decent pots for. I doubled memory (can't even remember, think 32 K to 64 K) and doubled clock. Maybe I fried it plugging a cartridge hot. IDK. Wouldn't know where to start or if parts are available. Should have tested the CoCo before bidding on the drive; totally forgot it had any problem though. If anyone could suggest an easy fix, that would be cool.

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  • May 30, 2019 at 6:17 am
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    love the retro references
    wax on wax off

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  • May 30, 2019 at 9:27 pm
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    8:44 great Music Remix Of Mario Kart 64

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  • May 30, 2019 at 9:28 pm
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    8:50 Mario Kart 64 2nd Lap Race Sound

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  • June 1, 2019 at 2:01 am
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    I have the cassette recorder for this I found it in a bin and repaired it I use it for school work

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  • June 2, 2019 at 10:22 pm
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    You should’ve tried sandpaper to remove the paint

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  • June 3, 2019 at 5:07 am
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    I think the TRS 80 ColoComputerer was from the early 80s. A friend of mine got one when we were in Jr High in the early 80s.

    Reply
  • June 3, 2019 at 10:12 pm
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    Better than the VIC 20

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  • June 9, 2019 at 3:57 am
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    Always go with stain paint and finish never flat or glossy

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:36 am
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    great stuff!!! where do you store all your work?

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 10:38 am
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    B.T.W. are there any girls watching this?

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  • June 19, 2019 at 3:06 pm
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    The white powder on the computer was not sugar, but it was crack

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  • June 19, 2019 at 8:51 pm
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    Why didn’t you just use a paint stripper for plastic?

    Reply
  • June 27, 2019 at 5:58 pm
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    The 8-Bit Guy

    I have an idea for the box for future projects. Simply cut out the original top and attach it to a box roughly the same size. In this case it also wasn't in great shape, but adds originality and you'll also never have to actually label it.

    Reply
  • June 28, 2019 at 11:18 pm
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    That was my first Computed! I upgraded it to 16k, bought a disc drive, "XY Board", and a printer.
    With what I spent then I could buy a Cray today!
    But I learned a LOT, and it had a Pretty good Missile Command game available!

    Reply
  • July 5, 2019 at 7:03 am
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    white powder is just 80's Cocaine

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  • July 5, 2019 at 8:25 pm
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    Fine business David.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 6:26 pm
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    Good job David!

    Reply
  • July 9, 2019 at 8:42 pm
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    Still looking forward to you doing a series on the whole line of Color Computers!

    Reply
  • July 9, 2019 at 10:26 pm
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    My color computer mrk 1 has a 64k memory 32 + 32 on a bank switch. I used to use it to copy cartridge games to software.

    The upgrade was done by Tandy UK.

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  • July 15, 2019 at 11:30 am
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    Wait… 16K? This guy is from future.

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  • July 15, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    It's not an original, as it has the newer full keyboard and not the chiclet type (some might call it MacBook Pro post 2017) keyboard.

    I remember that those keyboards were sold after 1983 when the IBM PC was introduced and were even made by one clone manufacturer.

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  • July 15, 2019 at 9:23 pm
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    was the WASD keys used for movement back in the day?

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  • July 23, 2019 at 4:00 am
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    Yay for Coco!
    My first computer was a Coco 3, in 1987.

    Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 7:01 pm
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    That computer could output 4K back then 🙂

    Reply
  • July 26, 2019 at 12:44 am
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    I would understand the S.A.M if you gave more detail ._.

    Reply
  • July 26, 2019 at 3:15 am
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    I know this isa couple of years ago, but if you paint then apply a clear coat it can stop the paint reacting with oils and make it easier to clean. Sometimes clear coat can give a glossy finish though

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  • July 26, 2019 at 6:08 pm
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    One little bit of TanyTrivia: One of their first computer to use that newfangled "compact disc" drives had a defect from the factory which caused the drive to cycle constantly until the drive eventually died. We knew it was going but left it alone as there wasn't much we could do about it until we could ship it back to Tandy..
    Oh course my favorite Tandy trinket is my embossed name tag from working there ;p Back when it was Radio Shack not Radioshack. that and the contant pressure to sell cellphone plans were 2 factors leading to their demise imho.

    I guess my most obscure computer is a black Bell&Howell computer which was a rebranded Apple ][ which I upgraded to a ][+ motherboard, having not considering leaving the thing stock, although I think the board is somewhere in my archives..

    Reply
  • July 27, 2019 at 9:34 am
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    imagine if the dude who owned this pc found this video

    Reply
  • July 28, 2019 at 8:51 am
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    Very cool! I still have my old Co-Co although it was lovingly referred to by us devotees as a Trash 80. My brother even made a disk drive for it from another computer entirely. I want to play with it again but no idea where you get displays now that will work with it. Anybody know if there are converters to HDMI?

    Reply
  • July 28, 2019 at 8:59 pm
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    The Coco 1 was my prized possession in 1982. Recently picked one up on eBay in mint condition. Have it working with the CoCo VGA, it's amazing to relive those fond memories as well as having a working piece of computer history.

    Reply
  • July 29, 2019 at 10:38 am
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    It looks so fancy and shiny!

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  • July 30, 2019 at 6:00 am
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    I actually knew the guy (Bob Barefoot of Ottawa) who created one of the first composite videos for the coco. In the hi-res graphics mode one could get 51 columns of text, and there was a word processor which used it which was very popular.

    Reply
  • July 30, 2019 at 8:08 am
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    what is it means 4k ram ??

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  • July 30, 2019 at 8:30 pm
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    My radioshack trs80 was alot different. It was a white keyboard that hooked to a t.v. the hard drive was a tape recorder. The modem used a telephone receiver.

    Reply
  • July 31, 2019 at 12:01 am
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    What about MSX? They were very popular in the 80's. Why don't you have videos about MSX computers?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 10:54 pm
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    when i hear him say 4k and 16k I'm thinking in screen resolutions and not kilobytes of ram XD

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  • August 1, 2019 at 6:10 pm
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    Nice, Bro!!

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  • August 1, 2019 at 6:20 pm
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    this retro tech looks so satisfying))

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  • August 2, 2019 at 6:19 pm
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    I have one of those with the horrible keyboard, the 16k model

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  • August 3, 2019 at 7:44 pm
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    They weren't any good new….

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  • August 4, 2019 at 1:38 pm
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    I like the ending music, what is it?

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  • August 5, 2019 at 8:40 am
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    I couldn't help but notice that half of the capacitors at 10:12 had been disconnected. I wonder why.

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  • August 5, 2019 at 10:55 am
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    i still got mine and it still works lol

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  • August 6, 2019 at 4:16 pm
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    If you can find a local modeler you can try to get him to use Vallejo metal paint and a couple layers of clear coat

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  • August 9, 2019 at 12:30 am
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    looks great

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  • August 9, 2019 at 2:10 am
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    Everytime I paint something and try clear coating it turns hazy on me.I hate painting.

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  • August 12, 2019 at 2:23 am
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    First computer we had as a kid was a CoCo 2 and loved it. Just snagged one on ebay 10 minutes ago and lurking around for Tandy content. Great video!!

    Reply
  • August 12, 2019 at 8:31 am
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    8-bit guy: using baking soda
    TRS-80 (laughing): you have no power here

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  • August 15, 2019 at 6:52 pm
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    Yep – spent my summer job money from working in 1980 to buy my $400 coco. 4K RAM. Shortly late upgrades to massive 16K. I built in a joystick to the top of it. Sold it on eBay about 18 years ago. Wish I had kept it. Mine didn’t look this bad though. Love seeing all the things you tried.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2019 at 7:01 pm
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    Oh color football 🏈- we played that all the time! That’s how most of my joysticks broke and then I started just making my own

    Reply
  • August 16, 2019 at 10:37 pm
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    i use to work in tandys radio shack in the early 80s selling the trs 80 computer.at the time the best game you could get on it was hunchback at the time you had to imput shit in to your pc.and you got what you put in which was a coloured screen or maybe a piano .and by the way it was the first 32 bit pc

    Reply
  • August 17, 2019 at 2:38 pm
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    2:19 Anthrax?

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  • August 17, 2019 at 9:33 pm
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    The new color looks divine! I remember right away
    RoboCop =)))

    Thank you for the video!!!

    Reply
  • August 18, 2019 at 12:20 am
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    My house burned down, so I used WD-40

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  • August 18, 2019 at 9:44 pm
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    I like what he's doing but his voice is annoying

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  • August 19, 2019 at 12:20 am
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    Hi – really enjoyed this. Best way to remove paint from plastic is with fine (1000 – 1500 grit) sandpaper; use Meguiars PlastX polish ( https://www.meguiars.com/automotive/products/meguiars-plastx-clear-plastic-cleaner-polish-g12310-10-oz-liquid ) for a gloss finish after sanding, if desired. To get an exact paint match, take the unit to a paint store and get an exact match using their photometer. You can then put the mixed paint in a Pre-Val sprayer (really cheap; just a glass jar hooked up to a replaceable compressed air cartridge) to apply a spray paint finish. ( https://preval.com/ ) This is the best way I've found to restore painted plastic parts. Hope this helps – Charlie

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  • August 19, 2019 at 2:34 am
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    Gloves!

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  • August 20, 2019 at 4:27 pm
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    I loved my CoCo it was my frist computer! I now have computers that would be supercomputers by comparison.. My old little CoCo finally went the the "big computer room in the sky" I still have fond memories of that that computer and I still have the cassette drive..

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  • August 20, 2019 at 6:29 pm
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    David: "I don't know what I'm doing."
    Also David, later: "This computer certainly looks A LOT better than it did."

    Determination, precision, care, and patience are more important than initial knowledge and are often in short supply. These are areas where I know I am lacking as a person, so I have incredible respect for someone who can follow through and do something like this with this level of quality without ever having done it before.

    Now, to go tackle cleaning the bathroom.

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  • August 21, 2019 at 6:00 am
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    This guy is like the Bob Ross of tech

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  • August 21, 2019 at 4:59 pm
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    Ah yes, a trash 80 with "white powder."

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  • August 24, 2019 at 2:12 am
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    Should of used some 0000 steel wool.

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  • August 24, 2019 at 4:57 pm
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    1980: 8-bit Chess, $40.

    2019: 4K Space Chess Odessey, Free with In-App purchases.

    Oh how far we've come.

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  • August 24, 2019 at 10:43 pm
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    13:37 you had mario sounds in the background

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  • August 27, 2019 at 9:47 pm
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    Those are not games. They are clearly (1) plans for the Deathstar battlestation and (2) a targeting practice application.

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  • August 30, 2019 at 1:15 am
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    Staying far back not only prevents runs but also allows the solvent to mostly evaporate before hitting the plastic. This prevents it from degrading the plastic if it's acetone or toluene based.

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  • September 2, 2019 at 3:17 am
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    I was a "serious" CoCo user when I was a kid. I had the CoCo2 and then the Coco3 128K. I spend a lot of time typing in code that I got from a magazine called "The Rainbow". They had lots of submissions, and I would key in all the Color BASIC and then RUN the program. And they even had some assembly language programs, too. It was fun.

    The Coco3 128K had more power than the CoCo2, the plus the "true" uppercase/lowercase lettering helped when it came to word processing.

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  • September 2, 2019 at 3:49 am
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    I had a color computer 2, and the reason you had to do so much typing, is because data storage was sometimes unreliable, and you lost data, and so I had to retype very large programs over again that I had printed off, on a crappy little thermal printer, almost like receipt tape. Yes as a youngster I was very dedicated, and I used to program so much, it would give me nightmares. Lol!

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  • September 2, 2019 at 10:07 pm
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    "Chiclet keyboard that was notoriously terrible"

    Laughs in ZX81

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  • September 7, 2019 at 11:14 am
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    Can it play Fortenite ;D JK XD

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  • September 8, 2019 at 12:19 pm
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    I love how it came with a pride flag

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  • September 8, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    YYEEPPIIIII!

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  • September 9, 2019 at 6:00 pm
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    What label printer is that?

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  • September 18, 2019 at 12:12 am
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    Fantastic Job! The very first computer I ever owned was a Trash-80 CoCo 2. Really impressive.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 4:40 pm
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    а ха ха ха 4к

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  • September 22, 2019 at 12:33 am
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    4K computing way back in the 80s…

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  • September 23, 2019 at 12:52 am
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    I miss my Coco! I started with a stock 4k Coco 1, got the memory upgrade to I think it was 64k, then the 2 came out and I saved up for it, but before I bought it the 3 came out so I got that and the floppy drives for it. Ended up going all the way with OS9 etc. I had years and years of fun with that thing!

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  • September 26, 2019 at 11:22 pm
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    I find of like the destresed CPU look

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  • September 27, 2019 at 12:03 am
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    5:40 hi david. you could use just toothpaste. i cleaned a lot with just regular blendamed haha.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 11:55 am
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    Use windscreen ice remover

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  • September 30, 2019 at 2:53 am
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    looks good and its usable dont fret over it too much😃

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  • October 4, 2019 at 3:50 pm
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    For painting a computer like this, you want to start with a layer of primer with a color similar to the one you're going to apply. Follow this with your color paint. And finally, you want to use a clear coat of your desired finish (matte, gloss, etc) to seal it. The clear coat can protect against minor scratches and will keep the color from degrading from oils or light as fast, as clear coat tends to be very UV stable.

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  • October 7, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    I know those old boxes really well. that one was vintage 1981 and those ram chips are 64k a print mem will show 32k as 1/2 the ram is set aside for graphics by default unless you specify under program control otherwise. I ordered the technical reference manual for mine in 82 so I could mod the unit. I was the technical goto guy for a coco group at that time. I supported 6809e hardware interface, and assembly language for the coco.

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  • October 7, 2019 at 3:04 pm
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    Mine had a switch I installed to disable the activation of the non maskable interrupt signal from the cartridge slot enabling me to copy rom packs to cassette. What was a big hit for people was showing how to double the clock speed through software and making the computer faster. Anyway enough of me..good presentation.

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  • October 7, 2019 at 3:06 pm
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    composite video on a CoCo? easy peasy.

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  • October 7, 2019 at 9:09 pm
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    When I was in primary school (K through 4, 1980 through 1985) there were several of these in the various classrooms that mostly just collected dust. They were the version of the TRS-80 that had a built-in monochrome monitor and two floppy drives, as well as having a real full-stroke keyboard. The only thing I remember doing with them is some basic math exercise program. It would display a math problem, like 3 × 8 and you would type in the answer and press enter. When you finished it displayed your time of completion and the percentage of problems that you got correct. Some kids took that "game" wicked seriously, like David Chabot, who would get all tensed up like he was waiting for a starting pistol in a race, go as fast as he could (which was funny to watch), and then brag about his results.

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  • October 10, 2019 at 6:41 am
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    Don’t inhale that white powder, especially through your nose.

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  • October 13, 2019 at 3:29 am
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    i run a bbs 4 lines off a trs 80 back in the late 80s man those were the days

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