Hello! So in today’s episode, I’m going to be showing you how to rebuild an old laptop battery. Now in this particular example, I’m going to be using this old ibook clamshell, but keep in mind that what I’m going to be showing you really could be applied to just about any laptop or even an appliance like a cordless drill. Okay, now one of the first things I wanted to tell you is there’s really no reason to be apprehensive about doing a procedure like this. Take this battery for example, I mean it is dead. I mean it is totally dead. It will not run the laptop even for 10 seconds, so no matter what I do to this battery I’m not going to make it any worse off than it is now. Okay, the first step is to take the battery apart. This particular one is held together by snaps. Some batteries use screws and some even use glue, but I’ve never come across a battery that couldn’t be disassembled with some patience. Okay, so once the battery was apart, I knew what kind of cells it used. As I suspected, they were 18 650 cells, or around 3.7. Volts. So the next step was to jump on eBay and buy some. Alright, so let me give you a little warning about buying a lithium batteries on eBay. if You buy a cheap, Chinese battery like an ultra fire, you can be absolutely sure that whatever they list as the milliamp hour rating is a total lie. For example a good battery like made by Panasonic or Samsung will typically advertise a milliamp hour rating of somewhere between 2000 and 2500, and that’s pretty realistic. Now if you look at for example these ultra fire batteries on eBay, you’ll see they’re advertising 6,500 Milliamp hours. That is total bull. So realistically, the sad part is is these batteries actually have even less than the name-brand batteries. When people have tested them they’ve actually found they’re more like 1000 or 1500 milliamp hours rather than 6500. I mean think about it. The Tesla Model S uses 18 650 batteries. If 6500 milliamp hour cells really existed then that car would be able to get around 730 miles of range, instead of 280 miles. But what they are is super cheap. Yeah, I actually paid like $1 apiece for these batteries, and that’s actually pretty good because a name-brand battery would run more like four or five dollars apiece, and since this is not a computer, I really need a lot of runtime on, it’s mostly just an experiment, you know I’m okay with the lower milliamp hour rating. One thing that’s good to do is sort of sketch out the arrangement of the cells. How this battery pack is set up is that the cells are actually paired together, and the pairs are arranged in series like this. The main Power Connects at each end, but there are sensor wires between each cell pair for monitoring and balancing. In fact, if I really wanted to be cheap, I could actually eliminate four cells of this pack and it would still work just fine, but the run time would be cut in half. By the way, when working with batteries, I always like to keep one of these nearby, just in case I overheat one in order to go into like thermal runaway or something. So, now that I have the cells out of the battery, I need to desolder them, and one of the things I found out was that these metal clips were actually welded on, so I was not able to desolder them, so I had to use wires as a substitute. One of the first things I did was put some initial solder on the battery terminals. You need a pretty strong soldering iron to do this, as you have to heat the battery up pretty quickly to do this. You have to make sure the solder action has actually stuck to the battery like this. Of course, you have to get both sides, and the negative side is a little harder because there’s more to heat up. So then, I stripped some of the wire and began the process of soldering it onto the battery pack. I found it easier to take the batteries in pairs while doing the soldering, and I also eventually set up some wood blocks into kind of a jig that helped hold these together while I worked. Once all the main connections were done you could see how it mimics the design of the original battery pack. All that was left to do now is connect the original electronics to the cells. Then, I put it all back inside the original battery pack, and of course snapped it closed. Well, the cells apparently had no charge whatsoever, as the computer would not turn on, so I had to plug in the AC adapter. After a moment, it started to take the charge, and before long I could actually see the percentage start to rise. But keep in mind the battery pack is not calibrated. the only way to actually calibrate it would be to go ahead and fully discharge the battery and recharge it several times. That way the little microcontroller inside the battery pack would be able to learn the actual capacity of the battery. Once it was charged up, I unplugged it instead of timer going so I could see how long it would run. I turned off sleep mode to make sure that the computer stayed at maximum drain the whole time. So I’m not even sure how long a brand new battery is supposed to last on and iBook Clamshell. Now in the past, I’ve had used batteries go as long as two and a half hours, so my guess is a brand new one would do three, possibly even four hours. So it’ll be really interesting to see what these cheap batteries will do. So I noticed around the one-hour mark it was still going strong. So far so good. Or so I thought. It turns out it went into suspend mode not too long after and wouldn’t wake up. So I had to plug the power cable in, and sure enough it was drained to zero. So it turns out these el cheapo batteries from eBay will only run the computer for about 1 hour and 35 minutes, which is probably at least half of the original run time of brand new batteries, so that means the milliamp hour rating on these batteries is, like I mentioned before, probably closer to 1,000 maybe 1500 at the at the absolute best. So overall I’d say it’s a successful product because I pretty much knew what to expect when I was getting into it and so that’s just kind of a warning on those eBay batteries. You know, you get what you pay for, so as long as you’re okay with with the cheaper batteries and you know what you’re getting you know that’s fine.

Rebuild a laptop battery pack
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100 thoughts on “Rebuild a laptop battery pack

  • February 3, 2019 at 6:45 pm
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    good idea

    Reply
  • February 6, 2019 at 7:16 am
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    Notice (and warning): This will only work for dumb battery packs (for example the battery pack of the IBM 2141). If there is a circuit board included inside the battery package, for example to charge the batteries balanced and/or a chip (IC) to report the health of the battery, a 'smart' battery (not only just a simple current protection IC), this might not work and could be dangerous.

    The problem is the health data stored/recorded inside the IC. It is not calibrated like you noticed, well, it actually is, however with old batteries in mind. Some IC's use also a charge counter to determine the health status (lifetime) of the whole battery, after X charges it needs to be replaced and/or it will use a modified charge/operating scheme. This is for safety but also to sell new batteries.

    If you replace the batteries with new ones, the IC 'thinks' these batteries are still the old ones and charges the new batteries like the old ones (for example at higher current). Result: The batteries will last a little longer however not as long as should (like you noticed – no evidence the batteries are of bad quality) and the batteries could be damaged earlier, can get very hot, start to leak or even explode. You are warned, do not underestimate batteries of this type or caliber.

    You can only do this when you can reset the chip (must support an extended battery protocol) however only a few support this. In this example it is Apple, I am sure that is not possible. Don't waste your time and money to such revive projects, it won't last very long and could be (very) dangerous. Also solder the joints is a pretty bad practice but that's another story.

    No blame at all, hopes it helps by experience, by being informative to avoid unnecessary dangerous situations to other people.

    Reply
  • February 7, 2019 at 10:40 am
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    Use the good ones, screw cheap batteries.

    Reply
  • February 7, 2019 at 11:46 pm
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    While cheap battery cells might be ok for a laptop, I would feel better paying $5 for brand-name cells to put in something with more power consumption, like a Sony Aibo.

    Reply
  • February 18, 2019 at 9:57 am
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    good vid

    Reply
  • March 1, 2019 at 10:41 am
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    Nice video..
    Can u help me in changing my laptop battery.
    I removed all the battery but forgot the connection.
    My battery pack- li-lion battery
    PEGATRON
    packA322-H54
    10.8V
    4400mAh
    47Wh

    Reply
  • March 5, 2019 at 2:11 am
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    you make it seem like the main danger of "el cheapo" cells is not getting the advertised capacity – that's wrong. the main danger is burning down your house.

    putting cheap no-name batteries together into a pack like this without extensive testing/analysis is a very bad idea, because you can't rely on them having uniform behaviour or consistent quality. fakes that sometimes lack basic safety features are abundant.

    Reply
  • March 13, 2019 at 4:31 pm
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    interesting points ,if anyone else trying to find out how to recondition used car batteries try Panlarko Recondition Planner ( lovy.biz/zrsy ) ? Ive heard some super things about it and my m8 got great results with it.

    Reply
  • March 17, 2019 at 12:13 am
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    I don't like the idea of buying batteries from people who lie about their capacity. To me, that sounds like enabling and encouraging a liar to keep lying.

    Reply
  • March 18, 2019 at 1:49 am
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    I heard of ThinkPad batteries being rebuilt with recharge AA’s, any clue if it works with Lithium Ion batteries?
    Thanks.

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  • March 23, 2019 at 5:03 pm
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    thank you, 70€ for a new one is just too much

    Reply
  • March 23, 2019 at 5:17 pm
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    Is this safe to do?

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  • March 25, 2019 at 4:19 pm
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    using AA batteries are cool

    Reply
  • April 5, 2019 at 2:24 pm
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    9bl matwlli dakchi z3ma

    Reply
  • April 6, 2019 at 10:43 pm
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    why was this "new" in my subscriptions

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 4:39 pm
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    Sorry David, utmost respect for you, but soldering to a lithium ion battery is the tantamount to setting up a time bomb. When these batteries build up pressure, there is a vent on the top under the positive terminal. This valve is actuated by a spring with very specific tempering. Heating up the battery to solder on it ruins the tempering of this spring. If the battery has a "non-passive failure" (in other words, starts venting flame), the damaged spring may not relieve pressure, so instead of a small jet of fire, you could have an explosion. It's like using a recalled airbag. It won't hurt you until you are in a car accident, but when you are in a car accident, it could be a lot worse as a result of this. Just buy a third party replacement battery.

    Reply
  • April 18, 2019 at 8:39 pm
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    i saw awsoneairguns

    Reply
  • April 22, 2019 at 11:15 am
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    Did anyone try tp to this with an Acer Travelmate 800? Is it possible to take it apart without destroying its battery?

    Reply
  • April 23, 2019 at 9:21 pm
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    So can we add 4 cell and extend the battery life? Then 3d print a larger battery case to fit the laptop ?

    Reply
  • April 27, 2019 at 2:15 am
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    So I have a question? I have started to do basic soldering i.e. replacing the rechargeable battery component in Dreamcasts, replacing capacitors in Game Gear and alike. I've been using a rosin core solder but I'm curious what kind of flux I should buy if I'm going to do more intricate work like repairing a trace etc? If you have the time I would appreciate your insight @8bitguy .
    Thank you, Kelon

    Reply
  • April 29, 2019 at 6:38 pm
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    Im pretty sure you need to test all the batteries and see the voltage. And then pair the batteries with closest voltage possible to get the best result

    Reply
  • May 5, 2019 at 9:16 pm
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    IMR is too expensive for little current like laptop, ICR more powerful, it have more mAh on one cell (2500 vs 3200 mAh).

    Reply
  • May 9, 2019 at 5:07 am
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    I am going to do something similar. Did all the batteries survive the soldering?

    Reply
  • May 16, 2019 at 6:16 am
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    Chinese not good for everything.

    Reply
  • May 22, 2019 at 3:09 pm
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    Could there be an issue with AA batteries replacing those batteries? Maybe make them replaceable. Like toys

    Reply
  • May 25, 2019 at 6:06 am
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    I have an 40000MAH Samsung Power Bank, their are 8 Samsung Pink 18650 Battery, It had 1 year warranty by Samsung . I think each battery has 5000 MAH capacity. Were do I get real 5000 MAH 18650 battery.

    Reply
  • June 3, 2019 at 8:32 pm
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    just opened a modern internal laptop battery and I was surprised that the cells are flat. My intention was to check the possibility of change the damaged cells but although it seems very simple to detach the cells from the circuit I still haven t got a clue on how to do it, The other problem is that a made a big search on the internet about flat cells to assembly but couldn t find any, Have you seen this king of cell? Thanks

    Reply
  • June 7, 2019 at 12:57 pm
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    i like your quote 「you will get what you pay for」because i knew some people love to complaint about the something is not good as they expect when the pay cheap price

    Reply
  • June 13, 2019 at 7:45 pm
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    For that kind of load, you could use ICR batteries. Less max amp but greater capacity, around 3000 mAh, but not safe without a bms(no pb in a 'puter) If you need extra ompf use panasonic NCR18650PD: enough capacity (tesla use them) and they are a lot safer. IMR are "safe", can output 35-40 C but don't have a great capacity (1500 mAh).

    Reply
  • July 15, 2019 at 10:19 pm
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    Good life advice. If something sounds too good to be true, it is 🙂 will serve you well, both in life and on El CHEAPO BAY.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 10:06 am
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    The Battery Pack of my Blueberry Clamshell once started to produce a shrill noise, when plugged in. Too bad I threw away the complete battery pack.

    Reply
  • July 20, 2019 at 8:34 am
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    The IbookGuy? this is the first time I know that, this video was surprisely
    recommended.

    Reply
  • July 21, 2019 at 10:58 pm
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    Tks a lot I didn't knew I can replace it. My laptop have issues after a year with battery I guess one of them is short circuit degrading overall life

    Reply
  • July 24, 2019 at 3:42 pm
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    This video was made 4 years ago and outdated. Because now, the chinese got more cunning. They no longer sell wierd brands. They now sold OEM batteries with brands such as panasonic as well. So u can actually bought a fake panasonic battery that would eventually explode due to the fake numbers they lied.

    Reply
  • July 25, 2019 at 1:20 pm
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    Gosh, now that laptops become obsolete, your awesome video pops up in my recommended list… You got a big thumbs up and gained a new subsriber. 🙂

    Reply
  • July 27, 2019 at 8:29 pm
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    OMG! A curse word on this channel,I thought he never said any!

    Reply
  • July 28, 2019 at 1:28 am
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    if you heat them enough they explode, dont solder on them

    Reply
  • July 28, 2019 at 5:07 am
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    1:44 the 8 bit Guy only curse word

    Reply
  • August 1, 2019 at 5:42 am
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    Your laptop is beautiful

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 2:39 am
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    Hello everyone! I really need some help here, if at all possible. Here comes a freakin' wall of text, so prepare yourselves!

    Here's the story: I actually managed to do this with a very old Presario 1070's battery. I thought it was working because it was running for a short period of time, but it seems like it's stuck at 9% constantly, and the laptop seems just about completely unable to charge the battery at all. It seems to try, but it fails. I have to unplug and replug it into power numerous times to try to get it to charge, and it doesn't stay charging even if I manage to get it to start, either. I know the cells are good because I have tested them thoroughly, and I obtained them from a couple of other laptop batteries in better shape, so they're not from eBay. I don't understand what the issue is, and I really want this to work. I spent hours on this, and I can't let it all go to waste. Does anyone know what I might be doing wrong?

    I really appreciate any advice anyone might have. Thank you.

    Reply
  • August 4, 2019 at 4:20 pm
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    eyy, i knew this video would come in handy someday! fixed my giant power bank with this tutorial

    Reply
  • August 4, 2019 at 4:58 pm
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    Dislike, MUST NOT translate title only.

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 9:15 pm
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    Wasn't this a Kipkay video?

    Reply
  • August 8, 2019 at 11:48 pm
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    Often, you don't need to replace all the batteries, becouse the pack starts to fail when at least 1 battery has problems, not all of them. Keep this in mind: you can see which batteries are good/bad by charging and discharging them individually 2 to 3 times, leave them charged and next day see if any of them has a low voltage. (They are totally charged at 4.2V and discharged at 3V). Then you can put all the bad ones in the recycling bin (you really should do this, as they may start a fire) and replace them with new ones (or maybe don't, just like he explained at: 2:50).

    Reply
  • August 14, 2019 at 4:17 pm
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    So true about the counterfeit batteries on eBay. It also applies to Amazon. And it' not just the 18650 batteries, but even the NiMH rechargeable (AA< AAA, etc)…. Unbelievable that they tolerate these sales still. The counterfeiters will immediately refund your money in exchange for no bad reviews.. that's how they try to get away with their scam.

    Reply
  • August 16, 2019 at 3:20 pm
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    Hey My laptop can't charge
    it's fine to cut balance wire and use BMS to balance Wire cause You know
    I want to upgrade battery laptop capacity at least I can reach 15 amp battery 😀

    Reply
  • August 16, 2019 at 3:22 pm
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    Sir But My battery is 10 volt
    it's fine to add some little more Volt on it like 12.6 volt
    would it be problem for my battery???

    Reply
  • August 18, 2019 at 5:14 am
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    Will this work with new laptops as well, that have thin non user removable batteries?

    Reply
  • August 18, 2019 at 9:53 am
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    It said BULLSHIT WHAT THE HELL!?!

    Reply
  • August 19, 2019 at 12:06 pm
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    The problem is that the battery replacment for HP G62 is much cheaper than Lithium battery pack itself !!!

    Reply
  • August 20, 2019 at 4:29 pm
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    David, as a long term fan, I was really disappointed to see you make a video where you are telling people to use junk ebay cells in there laptop. Ultrafire cells are flat out dangerous, and by making a recommendation, you are taking your viewers lives in your hands. poorly made lithium batteries are as dangerous as a monkey with a handgun, and you are telling people with no battery building expertise to build a pack with unmatched junk cells. This is reckless for a couple different reasons. A: Putting cells with different internal resistance together in series creates an unstable pack and excess heat (and cheap knockoff cells are known to vary in resistance WIDELY) If you don't have a way to check internal resistance you shouldn't try to build a pack. B: People with little or no experience are gonna probably overheat while soldering, which could lead to the cell blowing up in their face. It just isn't worth the risk if you don't have the proper equipment, and are you really going through batteries on you laptop often enough that the 10-20$ you save buying garbage cells is really worth risking your house burning down, or your pac blowing up in your face. This video was absolutely irresponsible and I believe it should be taken down.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 2:39 pm
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    Your lucky to get 500mah from cheap Chinese batteries.

    Reply
  • August 26, 2019 at 2:52 pm
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    Hi, will u plz share the link of good battery with good backup from Amazon.

    Reply
  • August 27, 2019 at 1:49 am
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    get some 18650's from Tesla

    Reply
  • August 28, 2019 at 12:55 am
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    Most laptop batteries stop working if you remove the cells

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  • August 28, 2019 at 1:06 am
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    and how did you reset the BMS??? Otherwise is NOT workng

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  • August 29, 2019 at 8:40 pm
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    Those 2500mAh fakes are actually only 500mAh per cell, they are really light and designed to have a really poor capacity.

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  • September 7, 2019 at 11:41 pm
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    These fake cells are usually used cells that were rewrapped and new tops and bottoms welded on. You can get some good ones, 1500-2000mah, but usually you'll get really tired cells that are 500mah max. However for applications which don't require long runtime, they work alright, and shouldn't explode if you don't overload them too much. However you would probably get the same quality of cells out of a used worn out laptop battery for a lot cheaper.

    Reply
  • September 10, 2019 at 6:09 pm
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    pls take a dead Lenovo IBM pack and bring it back to life . has some protection to bypass to get it working even if u change new and charged cells it doesn't provide output

    Reply
  • September 11, 2019 at 5:37 pm
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    Title should be buying battery from ebey.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2019 at 10:21 pm
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    With those self soldered batteries security people would stop you from going into the airplane ✈️ 😋

    Reply
  • September 12, 2019 at 6:47 pm
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    I love your cable management, especially on that ring cable acting as a copper coil. Please fix that

    Reply
  • September 14, 2019 at 1:57 pm
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    Yeah!!!

    Reply
  • September 15, 2019 at 12:29 pm
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    Hi sir, thanks for the teaching. I have a battery with cell number 18650 which is not good and i want to replace it with a different battery cell which has different number on it. Can this work sir? The number on the battery don't matters?

    Reply
  • September 19, 2019 at 8:55 am
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    "ultrafire" batteries have capacity from 50mah to 400mah.

    Reply
  • September 21, 2019 at 8:35 pm
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    When I think about batteries, I don't think about the time they last, I just use it as a support for when electricity runs out (storms) or when I want to change the laptop from one room to the other. 5 minutes would be enough for me to save what I'm doing and properly shutdown the system without damage to the harddisk. I'm lucky my 10 year old laptop still allows me these 5 minutes when power runs out.

    Reply
  • September 30, 2019 at 4:56 am
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    Is this cheaper than buying a new battery pack? How can I do this without soldering?

    Reply
  • September 30, 2019 at 4:57 am
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    How do I do this to my HP Mini 110? I can't open the pack…

    Reply
  • September 30, 2019 at 6:07 am
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    Buy real brand batteries on NKON.nl

    Reply
  • October 5, 2019 at 1:51 am
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    You only get what you pay for when it's cheap.

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  • October 12, 2019 at 4:45 pm
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    a good test would be to fully charge the batteries and then you left it out of the laptop for lets say a day and try to turn it on in the next morning or so… if it holds up more than 95% you could use it as a travel emergency pack

    Reply
  • October 13, 2019 at 11:12 pm
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    I’m going to rebuild a PowerBook G4 Titanium battery with 8 genuine 3500mah 18650 cells from Panasonic and this video sure helped me!

    Reply
  • October 16, 2019 at 12:20 pm
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    Hi. How to restore the battery if the microcontroller does not want to accept new batteries ?

    Reply
  • October 17, 2019 at 7:14 am
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    Hello Sir! I liked your video/info. So i wanna replace my laptop battery cells. What mAh power should i go for? I do want the laptop charge to last longer. Thank you!

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 2:02 am
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    Great video! I am currently rebuilding a battery pack for my little Mitsubishi Amity CN laptop-netbook from 1996. I use a lithium battery pack from ikea, made for their bluetooth speakers.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 12:41 pm
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    Can you show me 6s laptop battery wiring.

    Reply
  • October 22, 2019 at 7:37 pm
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    Need to rebuild my advent verona i cant find a battery anywhere for a reasonable price

    Reply
  • October 27, 2019 at 2:01 am
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    Song name at the end plz

    Reply
  • October 27, 2019 at 3:05 am
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    Thanks for the video , i have a question: they told me if you want to change the battery you must not remove the old one before you connect the new one to the electronic circuit because it will lose their memory and it will not work at all even if the new battery is good !
    Is that true ? Is it a successful process to change the the battery ? Can i remove the old one without losing the memory of the circuit ?

    Reply
  • October 28, 2019 at 11:55 am
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    Old 'dud' OEM laptop batteries often contain good and bad cells. I dismantle the fully discharged battery, check cells for rating compatibility, individually charge them in a suitable AA charger (Amazon?) then test for ~3.7V output. I retain any good ones — being OEM, they're high quality. A Weller-type soldering gun beats a small electronics iron IMHO, rapidly heating the pole metal before the cell absorbs too much heat.

    Reply
  • October 30, 2019 at 9:43 pm
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    Who’s in 2019
    DISLIKE IF YES

    Reply
  • October 31, 2019 at 3:55 pm
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    I have been looking into this to create a PRAM battery for my Powerbook G3, It appears to read 11v when it is supposed to be 17v. I see David using a solder iron and other people using a spot weld. I imagine spot weld is the best because that is how they are made and the whole heat transfer thing. I don't know why a battery clip or compression connection, is not something people try. NO solder or weld, just a copper strip pressed against the cell. It seems a lot simpler. Anyone have any thoughts on this?

    Reply
  • November 1, 2019 at 7:10 pm
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    I had no idea that electric cars ran on simple little batteries like I have in a flashlight. Or even a laptop battery for that matter.

    (Sure the 18650's are a bit bulkier than AA's, but not by a lot).

    Reply
  • November 2, 2019 at 11:24 pm
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    Im using i5 520n laptop 2nd gen
    My battery drains so fast
    I checked that my battery is 4400 mah however my galaxy c9 pro has 4000 mah battery
    Please tell me that how much mah of battery has requied for my machine

    Reply
  • November 6, 2019 at 2:38 am
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    At this point batteries are at 3500 milliamps

    Reply
  • November 6, 2019 at 4:40 pm
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    No, THANKS. I don't like fire ……
    Maybe you try change battery in dell 5540?
    …….. I do not think so … It's not simple job 🙁

    Reply
  • November 7, 2019 at 2:59 am
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    oooh… Soldering Li-Ions is never a good idea. They're def not designed to withstand 600++ °F without damage. Premature failure is only a matter of time… In this case it prob doesn't matter but this is such a widespread bad practice.

    Reply
  • November 7, 2019 at 10:20 am
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    I would buy a cheap replacement battery for a HP or something for around £9, break that apart to rob the cells. It would have slightly better cells and already have the tabs to solder to.

    Reply
  • November 8, 2019 at 2:40 am
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    Damn lol I was hoping this would be easier. I don't have the tools nor knowledge to soder anything and it looks scary AF. I feel it's high risk in my hands in the case of fucking it all up permanently lol

    Reply
  • November 8, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Вскрывать корпус отверткой? =D Лайк за колхоз!

    Reply
  • November 8, 2019 at 7:09 pm
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    Hello. My laptop needs the battery plugged in for updating the bios, but I removed the battery as it was bloated and didn't hold a charge. The question is, can I put the battery back in with the cells removed? will I need to short the cables connecting to the cells or just leave the ends separate and disconnected from anything? thank you.

    Reply
  • November 10, 2019 at 4:03 pm
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    Şarj devresini yeniden programlamadan pil nasıl çalışıyor, açıkla?

    Reply
  • November 11, 2019 at 12:26 am
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    some of the "namebrand" 18650s from ebay turned out to be fake! i might want to do that replace the cells, but would use a better quality brand! thanks & great video! did you put a small amount of RTV or silicone sealant on tbe wires you soldered on the ends, for corrosion prevention? thanks

    Reply
  • November 12, 2019 at 1:30 am
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    Good ole 18650’s gotta luv um‼️

    Reply
  • November 12, 2019 at 1:33 am
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    “Better” batteries might be protected tho

    Reply
  • November 12, 2019 at 8:00 pm
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    You forgot to tell that the batteries should be at the same voltage before getting assembled! It is important, if they’re not at the same voltage that what can happen.
    1. Extremely heat and no charging .
    2. Very slow charging .
    3. No charging at all.
    They all should be at 3.7 Volt at least and you discharge them after assembly not charge them at first.

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  • November 14, 2019 at 4:42 am
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    Man I learn so much from you .excellent channel you are a very great teacher

    Reply
  • November 15, 2019 at 4:15 pm
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    Re: fake exaggerated specs; likewise the ee bay and sallyxpres LED lights (flashlights etc) are way over the top in terms of claimed lumens

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  • November 16, 2019 at 11:21 am
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    Die Akkus von Sony mit 2700mAh bekommt man im Tabakwarenladen für etwa 11€ das stück. Also mit etwa 90€ sollte man rechnen für alles. Aber vorsicht beim ein- und ausbauen, die Akkus liefern bis zu 100W Strom und parallel geschaltet bis zu 200W. Das sind echte Terrorstifte!

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