This is all Home Depo’s fault, I went there
the other day and saw what they were charging for 10 foot 3/4″ metal conduit pipe. In Canada, we often pay twice s much as Americans
do for things so $3.85 for 10 feet of metal conduit really caught my attention. Instantly I thought SCORE! So I bought 36 pieces. Enough to make a 200 sq foot 2V geodesic dome
greenhouse frame. This video series will follow how I’m building
a 4 Eason greenhouse as economical as possible for Manitoba Winters. Simple Tec. Technology, Agriculture and Energy Videos. Hitting the subscribe button tells YouTube
these are the kind of videos you want to see more of. Click the subscribe button now. So I took the ten foot conduit pipes and measured
them using an online geodesic 2V dome calculator. One cut, no waste, 2 pieces from one using
a simple grinder and a vice to hold the pipe. Next I put all the pipes together on the ground
and verified I had cut them all to the same length. I was quite impressed that they all lined
up almost perfectly. I marked an inch and a half on each side wit
a sharpie marker as a guide so I’d know how far to squish the end of each pipe. Then I used one of the pipes as a ruler to
draw my inch and a half line across of them in one big swipe. Voola! all marked and ready to go to the squisher. Ok the technical name is something like hydraulic
press but I really like the term squisher. That just works for me so You’re gonna hear
me call it that quite a bit from now on. So after marking all the pipes, I turned on
the squisher and was really impressed at how easily this tool flattened the ends of the
pipes. Much better than trying to do this with a
vice or a hammer. It’s very important to have the other side
squished on the same level plane as the first side, so I rigged up a way to ensure when
squishing both sides were level to each other. Next I used a sharpie to mark the ends with
a dot, to know where to drill the bolt holes. 3/4 of an inch from the end of each side of
the pipes. The drill press made putting the bolt holes
in easy. I couldn’t imagine how much harder this would
be with a regular drill. Precession and speed happen when you have
the right tools. Or at least know the right people to borrow
the right tools from. Of course there are some metal shavings on
the drilled holes. So using a big mounted grinder is essential
if you want the pipe ends to fit together snuggly. It’s quick and easy to grind off the shavings
from both ends of the pipes. The angle of the pipe ends is extremely important
on a geodesic dome. One pipe is supposed to be 18′, the other
16′. Using a roofer’s protractor, I found the squisher
made them all about 16-18′, distinguishing one or two degrees from that was almost impossible,
so I’m hoping on assembly of the dome I can easily bend the couple of degrees necessary
to complete the dome. That’s it for this video. All pipes measured, cut, squished, drilled,
grinder and angles verified. In the next video I’ll show how I assembled
the dome. Thank you for watching and please take a moment
to hit the subscribe button. Hitting subscribe tells youtube to suggest
to you more videos about technology, agriculture and energy. Thank you for watching.

Making Metal Geodesic Dome struts under $2 each DYI – Part 1 (2020)

41 thoughts on “Making Metal Geodesic Dome struts under $2 each DYI – Part 1 (2020)

  • February 28, 2018 at 6:24 pm
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    I would love any comments/ideas on this! I'm always looking for better ways to do things on a budget!

    Reply
  • March 22, 2018 at 11:35 am
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    Very cool design! I don't have the shop equipment that would make this easy to create, but its a great idea. This feels like an incredible micro-enterprise for someone in each community, like yourself, who has the skill and tools to fabricate a mountain of these and get them out to folks!

    Reply
  • March 27, 2018 at 1:50 pm
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    I love your vdo and your designed and material.i plan to build one but i would like to use rebar and use the same material for cap each of both end straw to connects..i think rebar mabe cheaper but more work to do maybe. Thanks again for sharing your smart dome

    Reply
  • May 1, 2018 at 2:29 am
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    How do you plan to hold the greenhouse film on the dome ?

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  • May 4, 2018 at 10:32 am
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    look at this… it is inspiring at some points
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_odIPttYP8
    and this other way to put things toghether
    1
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WBoMnSnBYY
    2
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRhFdTYG-E0

    IMO the most efficient using low specs requirements is Paul Robinson, but again… to me, something like this
    8m 4 frequency with plane hubs seem easier, forget it is in wood, imagine concentric bores in big industrial flanges or washers (perhaps used as a bolted sandwich with struts end inside)… for the assembly
    look…
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ml3HHZLm5ro

    Reply
  • May 25, 2018 at 4:53 am
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    I've read that higher triangle domes are stronger such as 5v, but how large could you go with a 2v design? Mostly looking for a tall dome rather than overall sq feet for tropical trees. Might be able to keep them warm with compost piles in the winter.

    Reply
  • August 22, 2018 at 3:28 am
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    Thanks brother!!!!

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  • August 22, 2018 at 3:29 am
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    Hey can you make a video on how to build one in a tree?

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  • October 21, 2018 at 11:01 pm
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    Under $2, but it takes a few thousand worth of tools/equipment

    Reply
  • November 14, 2018 at 10:17 am
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    Wish youd included your strut lengths. A=?
    B= ?

    Reply
  • December 31, 2018 at 7:27 pm
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    If you will have hole near the flat tip and 2-3 on its tube body; then, all connected to a Basin top; then, when water rain comes; then, all the veggie will be sprinkled. But, if it is as a dry Home; then only the top near the tip and where the sink is; or in the end tip where the water rain will go out to the garden. But, you have the nicest sturdy type.

    Reply
  • January 22, 2019 at 5:11 pm
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    FUXK!!!! I understood there were 36, not 72 parts GODDAMIT

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  • January 24, 2019 at 3:39 pm
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    Could you pour concrete down the tubes to make them stronger

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  • January 24, 2019 at 3:40 pm
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    How much waste material did you have? What was the total cost to do this. And could you actually splice pieces of pipe together with a dowel inside so you would have less waste?

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  • February 2, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    I don't know if people are ignorant or stupid. These designs are so intrinsically strong that not building with them is foolish! Go price the framing including the roof of a 200 sq/ft space. Scaling is tricky, but 1500 Sq/Ft would be $1500? Galvanized. Magnetic, great for magnets holding wrap during construction. Easy for a basic welder to attach fittings. But what would you have to do to mimic current housing styles? IE room divisions. Idiots in Cali are spending $400K per unit for homeless shelters. Isn't it amazing how the most inept gravitate themselves to positions of leadership and spending your money? $1000/sq/ft ? Trump towers for homeless? That money is not going into construction. The President knows the real cost, they obviously don't.

    Reply
  • March 6, 2019 at 5:52 pm
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    Thank you for your video. You made it look so easy.
    Have you looked at the Zip Tie Domes?
    Maybe you can do a comparison video in the future?

    Reply
  • May 18, 2019 at 2:15 am
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    Could you tell us the measurement where you cut the EMT to make the two pieces??

    Reply
  • May 21, 2019 at 10:43 pm
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    How much Tons on press?

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  • May 26, 2019 at 2:10 pm
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    Should have set up a tube guide with a backstop on the "squisher", thereby ensuring identical length of "squishing" on each tube, which also eliminates the need to mark them all, – and then include a parrot stand for supporting the flat portion, of the already formed first end, for the second end "squishing" operation, to ensure both ends are formed with a common plane.

    Reply
  • July 11, 2019 at 8:21 am
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    Growing your own bamboo would be the cheapest way to do this.

    Reply
  • September 3, 2019 at 10:48 pm
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    Liked because…squisher

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  • September 21, 2019 at 11:25 pm
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    Fyi Not "grinded" ground Just saying

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  • September 25, 2019 at 2:47 pm
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    Could I get away with using .5" conduit?

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  • October 14, 2019 at 2:33 pm
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    respect

    Reply
  • October 14, 2019 at 3:48 pm
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    Hey genius under $2 means under $2 not a 150 something with tax included you're not very smart

    Reply
  • October 15, 2019 at 6:21 am
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    شكرا على المجهود

    Reply
  • October 17, 2019 at 4:32 pm
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    Lol precision and speed, I could have drilled 4 holes to your one on the press…

    Reply
  • October 29, 2019 at 3:08 pm
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    It's easy to see it's not your press "tools"….

    Reply
  • October 29, 2019 at 4:09 pm
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    How awesome!! Clever!

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  • November 4, 2019 at 3:05 am
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    1:30 hahah i was leafing through my eyes
    The SQUISHIER sounds so good that imma call it like that!

    Reply
  • November 5, 2019 at 7:29 pm
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    You can squish them with a bench vise too

    Reply
  • November 5, 2019 at 9:29 pm
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    Instead of grinding off the burr on the drilled holes, use a counter sink. It’s quicker and doesn’t remove the galvanized finish on the flat.

    Reply
  • November 6, 2019 at 2:35 am
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    let me guess… You actually think your clever.

    Reply
  • November 7, 2019 at 10:20 pm
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    Sawzaw metal blade.

    Reply
  • November 29, 2019 at 10:54 pm
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    This comment section is cancer. You did good, and a hell of a lot cheaper than a kit. As you've pointed out, a hacksaw, hammer, and hand drill will accomplish the same goal, but it's must faster and easier with better equipment.

    Reply
  • December 2, 2019 at 9:15 pm
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    Can you use a sched 20 gi pipe sonce it would be cheaper than emt?

    Reply
  • December 3, 2019 at 9:08 pm
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    After you calculate the length of a strut, say it's 4 feet, is that the measurement from end-to-end of the pipe or hole-to-hole that you drilled?
    It seems it would be important to get that measurement correct. Thanks for you help. Good video!

    Reply
  • December 29, 2019 at 12:12 am
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    Thank you.

    Reply
  • January 5, 2020 at 4:54 am
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    Ground not grinded, but it got the point across.

    Reply
  • January 8, 2020 at 3:54 pm
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    I like it, can't find part 2 and 3 dude. Help me out please, Thanks!

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 5:21 am
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    Using a Milwaukee Pipe Cutter makes cleaner cuts…and a hole punch on the press will avoid the drilling.

    Reply

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