100 thoughts on “Linux Tutorial for Beginners: Introduction to Linux Operating System

  • December 17, 2017 at 10:48 am
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    The music didn't bother me at all…I found your tutorial to awesome and well explained…thank you so much for the step by step method…a lot of the other videos are very confusing and disorganized.

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  • January 3, 2018 at 5:52 pm
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    Came for a tutorial, stayed for the music and the nice tutorial

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  • January 12, 2018 at 10:23 am
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    Excellent tutorial for Beginners..Moving to Linux now.

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  • January 12, 2018 at 11:32 am
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    very helpfull video!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)) thank you!!!

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  • January 12, 2018 at 3:13 pm
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    Thank you guru for your effort to make this video

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  • February 2, 2018 at 12:37 am
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    Thanks so much for this video. Just what I have been searching for.

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  • February 7, 2018 at 2:49 am
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    Sir, please help me install an application using Wine But Installed Apps
    are not showing up in the Applications Menu In kali linux

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  • February 22, 2018 at 10:22 am
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    Thanks for wonderful training, tutorial is high quality and in detail. As a fresher in linux I learned lots of basic things. Thanks & appreciate.

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  • February 22, 2018 at 12:38 pm
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    Excellent video. It goes into quit some advanced stuff towards the end

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  • March 1, 2018 at 3:09 pm
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    an instructive video indeed !
    the only inconvenience is the music playing non stop in the back ground , makes it hard to listen for long time

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  • March 1, 2018 at 10:50 pm
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    i cannot here you over the background music. get ride of it! make a duplicate copy of this video with out it and see which is liked best i like your videos if i can here you the noise is distracting!

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  • March 16, 2018 at 8:40 pm
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    This is not clear sound. And please slow down.

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  • March 22, 2018 at 12:37 pm
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    You are the best Linux guru on youtube as far as I know! Thank you for this!

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  • March 25, 2018 at 7:27 pm
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    Linux was created as Linus' own personal Os and he wanted an Os. which he can use both at home and school. And at that time, Unix was hardly available. Also, he was using Minix at that time. he started linux as his own personal project and never intended to be publicly available.

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  • March 28, 2018 at 1:14 pm
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    Wonderful tutorial! Thank you so much, I've been trying to learn Linux but every tutorial gave very long commands of which I wished to understand the syntax and this is just what I needed 🙂

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  • March 29, 2018 at 12:11 pm
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    MINT IS MY FAVOURITE!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • April 11, 2018 at 2:53 am
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    thank you so much for tutoring.

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  • May 10, 2018 at 5:04 am
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    Can someone put a timestamps ? Plz

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  • May 23, 2018 at 6:35 pm
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    It's actually based on Minix.

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  • May 29, 2018 at 8:26 pm
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    hey can you make video..
    A TPM error (7) occurred attempting to read a pcr value
    error after installation of linux..in booting process

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  • June 12, 2018 at 12:57 pm
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    Kernel and OS are not the same thing. Linux is not an OS. Free Software is not free as in free coffee, but free as in free speech. Open Source is a lie, a disguised corporate capitalist agenda for proprietary control over software. UNIX and Linux are not the same thing. This was a short introduction to an idiot's mind.

    Remember…. as St iGNUcious says, "There is no system but the GNU system. Linux is one of its kernels". There is no OS called Linux. It is GNU/Linux…. pronounced as GNU-slash-Linux, NOT GNU-Linux NOR GNUandLinux. It is GNU-slash-Linux. GNU for life. Stallman for life. Free Software for life. Death to proprietary software. Death to open source.

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  • June 18, 2018 at 12:00 pm
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    Thanks, concise and structural information.

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  • June 27, 2018 at 5:38 am
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    Good video , thanks for such a great hard work.please upload SAP basis and Hana modules also. I very much thanks to Guru 99

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  • June 29, 2018 at 6:21 pm
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    Fuck-you 2 hours

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  • July 24, 2018 at 1:34 am
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    Thanks for such a wonderful explanation.. u have really made the learning easy..

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  • September 17, 2018 at 2:12 pm
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    you do need a firewall enabled regardless of viruses.

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  • September 25, 2018 at 1:26 pm
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    Great work bro

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  • September 29, 2018 at 4:04 am
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    TIL: Android is a linux distribution.

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  • September 30, 2018 at 6:11 pm
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    Its all about Linux, isn't it. Thank you Guru

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  • October 6, 2018 at 2:14 pm
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    Super, der Titel suggeriert das es sich um ein Tutorial in deutscher Sprache handelt, und dann ist es in englisch! Geil auf Klicks?

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  • October 8, 2018 at 7:16 am
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    Trying to practice the Pr command options. I followed and created a tools list and tried to divide the data into column but when i type in pr -3 tools and enter. It came out a blank page and when i check the file, the data still remain the same. Can anyone advice me how to solve this issue? The other Pr commands also reflects the same thing

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  • October 19, 2018 at 10:07 pm
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    Linux vs window is like android vs Apple lol

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  • October 23, 2018 at 9:55 am
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    Good video but background sound is horible

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  • October 23, 2018 at 4:34 pm
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    Hello sir muje app ka student banange kya

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  • October 23, 2018 at 5:44 pm
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    Excellent

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  • October 24, 2018 at 8:21 am
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    Titre en français vidéo en anglais ?

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  • October 26, 2018 at 9:19 am
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    good tut thnx Guru

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  • October 29, 2018 at 8:18 am
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    Amazing…Master Piece of Information for Beginners…Thank you very much for the tremendous efforts in creating this video. God Bless You

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  • October 31, 2018 at 11:29 am
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    Can't understand you pajeet

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  • November 6, 2018 at 11:18 pm
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    sudo apt get garden fence in google search.
    If you can not find it there,its not excisting.
    Linux is great.

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  • November 17, 2018 at 9:41 am
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    thank you so much for wonderful tutorial video. I really enjoyed your teaching, it was worth watching. Thank you so much sir. Lots of love from me

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  • November 18, 2018 at 4:53 am
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    This video is so annoying I fell asleep and thought I was having a nightmare.

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  • November 22, 2018 at 1:37 pm
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    Virtual machine is simplest way to try any OS.

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  • November 30, 2018 at 9:14 pm
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    How can I add a Shared partition that Anbox can access?

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  • November 30, 2018 at 9:29 pm
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    there is a typo in the change group ownership at 1:04:42

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  • December 1, 2018 at 10:23 am
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    the background sound is too irritable

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  • December 6, 2018 at 4:08 pm
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    1:09 Linux, in and of itself, is ONLY a kernel. Linux Mint and Ubuntu are operating systems built from the Linux kernel.

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  • December 6, 2018 at 4:14 pm
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    4:44 microshit and crapple stole their is system foundational ideas from xerox.

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  • December 10, 2018 at 5:47 am
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    Seems like a good tutorial but his speech pattern makes me want to die

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  • December 11, 2018 at 10:04 am
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    Check out COMPLETE LinuxTutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLckPQEKYlbxebubMWdjcGR7K_ukm35ZjN

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  • December 19, 2018 at 2:00 am
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    Thank you for this post. I am a newbie for learning Linux. This video is really useful for me.

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  • December 29, 2018 at 8:52 am
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    The background musick is just horrible shit…..Had enough by 8:03 turned it off…gave it thumbs down…If you don't mind pissing your subconscious off for 2hrs 29mins by feeding it that shit then good fucken luck to you

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  • January 1, 2019 at 2:19 pm
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    grate …

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  • January 13, 2019 at 8:33 am
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    Super video. Thank you.

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  • January 18, 2019 at 4:23 am
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    Although a very useful video i feel this title is a bit misleading. When im thinking about an introduction to an OS im looking for how everything is put together and communicates with each other. Things like file systems, drivers, package managers, interfaces & desktop managers, ect. So one can get an idea of why there are 1000 different distros and how to narrow down to what you might want to start on. Ive heard enough if your a " beginner try ubuntu " but nobody ever says why or they simply say its personal taste so go try out 100 different styles.
    Linux is so much more then just the terminal and in no way does it replace a GUI or vice versa. You know why people like GUI? Overview. We dont live in the stone ages anymore. It almost funny to see an introduction video thats nothing but 2,5 hours of terminal commands…….And people wonder why they still use Apple and MS.
    Its like watching an introduction to windows with nothing but powershell commands.

    Really this should be called an introduction to the Terminal in Linux.

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  • January 18, 2019 at 1:27 pm
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    How does one pause a tutorial video to answer the phone

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  • January 19, 2019 at 5:26 pm
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    51:21 —> file permissions..

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  • January 21, 2019 at 1:48 am
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    This is way to complicated I have no confidence that i could do this with out a expert sitting next to me to make sure I don't screw it up.
    To many steps how about some one invent an installer for this.
    I have problems waking up my computer from hibernate. You lost me on why you need the USB plug in thingy. Where do get USB thingy my local Radio shack went out of bisuness.
    Why can't you download to your desktop and install Thats how i install games from Big Fish, Thats How I installed my browser. Why the USB.

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  • February 2, 2019 at 1:07 am
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    This video is so interesting, please remove the sound, it is making difficult for me to understand.

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  • February 2, 2019 at 3:57 pm
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    I’m sorry this is not secure once I’m done with tutorials. I’m going to navagate this site and show you my exact problems.

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  • February 2, 2019 at 4:11 pm
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    Is this why stuff was being downloaded by itself with android and SIM cards being incerted remotely?

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  • February 2, 2019 at 4:18 pm
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    This is the voice that hacked me and took remote acess.

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  • February 4, 2019 at 7:10 pm
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    terminal starts from 27:54

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  • February 10, 2019 at 1:32 pm
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    Thanks so much for your tutorials… That has been very helpful especially for what I'm currently going through.

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  • February 15, 2019 at 5:41 pm
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    wow ! nice video.

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  • March 6, 2019 at 7:08 am
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    The best tutorials that I have seen…

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  • March 8, 2019 at 5:16 pm
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    Great content for beginners, especially since you compare to windows. I imagine most beginners are somewhat familiar with windows. However, I am not sure why you chose to use the background jingle in your videos. It is distracting and becomes maddening after the first half hour or so. Suggest you remove it if possible and embrace the fact that learning an OS is pretty boring.

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  • March 11, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Interesting, but to complicated for me. I find it easier to point and click.

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  • March 16, 2019 at 2:21 pm
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    Watch this in 1.5x speed!

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  • April 1, 2019 at 5:52 pm
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    is it only one video

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  • April 3, 2019 at 7:13 am
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    Is it mandatory that the remote host should use linux os in order to try out ftp,telnet & ssh commands?

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  • April 17, 2019 at 5:25 am
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    Linux or Windows?

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  • April 21, 2019 at 7:32 am
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    I'm studying for my A+ exam for CompTIA 220-1001. I 'am using Guru99 and Professor Messor and Mike Meyers as my teachers. I love them all. they are detailed and easy to understand. Thank you guys

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  • April 26, 2019 at 8:59 pm
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    me: hmm so i heard linux is free but i also heard its difficult well lets learn it searches up how to use linux on google
    google: heres a youtube link
    me: ok, well lets cli- 2 hours 29 minutes and 4 seconds nevermind

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  • April 28, 2019 at 2:21 am
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    Linux isn't an operating system it's just a kernel

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  • April 29, 2019 at 1:50 am
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    Really useful.

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  • May 6, 2019 at 1:23 pm
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    I think Linux Mint is a much better choice over Ubuntu for new Linux users. In fact I have found that most of those who try Linux and get discouraged and give up, started on Ubuntu. I would not recommend it to anyone.

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  • May 23, 2019 at 5:31 pm
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    Thanks for Help. really Useful information !

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  • May 24, 2019 at 10:19 am
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    Each and Every part of this tutorial is useful, Thank you so much

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  • June 2, 2019 at 2:32 am
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    Really helpful Guru99 thank you

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  • June 3, 2019 at 10:37 am
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    I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you're referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

    Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called "Linux", and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called "Linux" distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.

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  • June 27, 2019 at 4:39 am
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    Very good Tutorial can we have PPT or PDF for these ?

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  • June 29, 2019 at 5:47 pm
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    I think its not the best course for beginners but for those who have knowledge on Linux and want to have a quick recap this is the best one I came across ..

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  • July 2, 2019 at 2:46 am
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    In as much as it’s open source and all, I need something with a nice ecosystem. I don’t need it to be perfect and that’s why macOS is my preferred choice cuz it just works. Not interested in this.

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  • July 14, 2019 at 4:03 am
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    Thank you so much for your efforts !!! You made life easy for Linux Beginners !!!

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  • July 15, 2019 at 1:49 am
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    Thank you so much for sharing the video, this is the best video for learning UNIX

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  • July 17, 2019 at 8:27 pm
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    You are Guru99, in real. Thank you so much for all your efforts.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 12:23 pm
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    thanks for making such a useful video!

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  • August 7, 2019 at 1:28 pm
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    Thank you so much for this! I've learned so much.

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  • August 13, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    weird but moving command worked without sudo. Has something changed from that time? I have 18.04lts

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  • August 13, 2019 at 9:52 pm
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    thanks very helpful

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  • August 20, 2019 at 1:12 pm
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    Thanks It is best tutorial

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  • August 29, 2019 at 8:42 pm
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    Background voice is distracting sir.

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  • September 30, 2019 at 7:35 am
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    Question. 

    So, if you were to delete a directory without first deleting it's subdirectory and/or files, what would happen?

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  • October 6, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    I like the tutorials, however I do have some critical comments. When you referred to where program files are stored, the careful viewer would have noted that you pointed to the "/bin" directory. This and "/sbin" are, of course, locations for programs. However, the only programs stored in these two directories are the programs necessary to startup the system and to provide essential tools for fault maintenance.

    In all distros user programs are stored primarily in "/usr/bin." In some distros regular users only have "/bin" and "/usr'bin" in their command search path. "/sbin" and "/usr/sbin" are considered to be directories containing "system level" programs.

    While the user that installs the distro has superuser (sudo) capability, not all distros allow additional users (such a children maybe) to have such privileges. In all distros, it is possible for anyone with the administrator authority to limit the access of any user other than root.

    At least in some distros, the chown command only needs to be run with the sudo command when root is either the owner or group owner of the file (or for security reasons trying to make root the owner or group owner of a file).

    The pr and lpr commands are NOT, by themselves, suitable for printing a great many types of files. I believe that it should have been pointed out that once the first time setup of the system is complete printing from within most GUI based programs is performed essentially in the same manner as in Windows.

    The transition from printing to software installation was too abrupt and the discussion of printing was not 'closed' nor was the subject of software installation 'opened.' Also apt and apt-get are the cli installation tool for Debian based systems. Other systems such as Fedora do not use apt.

    Now this is clearly an opinion… I suggest that it would be useful to mention that the grep command can be used to search though directories as opposed to just searching files and can do so recursively.

    Excellent discussion of a very complex subject, regular expressions!

    In the discussion of environment variables you failed to mention what the export command actually does and why you might need it.

    In your discussion of ftp, telnet, ssh, you did not mention rcp/scp. Also use of both telnet and rcp are so strongly discouraged that issuing the telnet command usually runs ssh on modern distros as rcp run scp.

    You might want to mention that a command on the cli can be run in the background by simply appending "&" after the command name. Thus it is not necessary to run the command, stop the command, and push it into the background. The "bg" command is really only truly useful when you start a command in the foreground that you really should have started in the background.

    Also "killall <program name" allows one to kill a program without knowing the PID. However, this one can be tricky with GUI programs since the name in the header may not, and usually is not, the actual name of the program. In the case for "df" it is useful to know that you can specify "df , <device name or mount point> … <device name or mount point> … " to get the information for just your disk partition(s) or mount points of interest. So if you have installed everything in /dev/sda2 (for example), "df /dev/sda2 -h" would give you the data for just that partition leaving out the myriad of other mount points. Also "df / -h" would do the same. If your home directory is on a separate partition then you could use "df -h / /home" and get a listing for both.

    The "vi" command exists on all UNIX systems and probably all Linux system. It is usually linked to vim or other replacement (as you suggested).

    I agree with your insistence on naming scripts with an sh extension as this clues anyone, including the original creator of the script 6 or more months later, to the nature of what the file is. However, it is not actually required, it is only a practice that all good computer folks use. Also, if you set the execute permissions on the file itself, then you can execute the script by just typing its name without specifying bash first.

    When discussing comments in scripts I believe that you should have mentioned that in blatantly obvious examples such as you are using one would not normally insert a comment. But in complex scripts inserting comments about what various commands and sections of the script are doing is almost vital when one wishes to modify a script some time after it was created. It is close to mortifying to look at a script that you created last year with the question "What the heck was I doing here" in your mind and no answer in the script itself.

    In the perl tutorial summary, you throw out the comment that there are 3 types of variables in perl, but did not describe them in the presentation.

    In the virtual terminal tutorial you mentioned the tab completion key but you did point out that if you type tab once and nothing happens, you need to type it a second time because the portion of the command you want that you have already typed does not resolve into a unique choice. Typing tab twice in that case presents you with a list of all possible completions.

    In the administration tutorial when you finished entering the data on the cli for the user it would have, I think been a good idea to mention that the "Y" was capitalized to show that it is the default response. That is, if you don't enter anything but hit the enter key "Y" is assumed. This capitalization of the default response is quite common throughout Linux. If you update this video you might want to drop the mention of the finger command as it is not installed by default in many systems. Also, most systems are configured to not accept finger requests from outside the machine (i.e. remote finger requests are refused). As you probably know this is done for security reasons.

    Again, I would like to emphasize that I am impressed with the quality of these tutorials and my comments are strictly intended to provide information for your consideration.

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  • October 26, 2019 at 12:13 pm
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    Video is ausum but plz remove the song man………

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  • November 5, 2019 at 5:15 am
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    Very informative

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  • November 6, 2019 at 11:14 pm
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    Paid $ 30.50 for a USB version of Linux Lite 3.8, from Jerry BezenCON (University of Canterbury, New Zealand ). All I received was a blank USB. WHAT A RIP-OFF from a so-called Linux promoter

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  • November 10, 2019 at 10:43 am
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    Such a good introduction, you are good men.

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  • November 10, 2019 at 1:20 pm
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    One of the best tutorial. It is the consolidation of previous 18 videos and i assume it is updated.

    Reply

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