In this video we’ll be building a stylish
desktop volume knob, which, besides looking really cool, allows you to finely control
the loudness of your music in a tactile way. As you can see, the knob itself is made out
of concrete, so feels pretty solid. The design is also completely customisable, so you can
match it to your desk setup. Here for example I used plexiglass for the
base, and added an LED to give it a ring glow, which looks really cool. If you do customise yours and want to share your results with others, then why not check
out this week’s sponsor which is a completely free app called Maker Amino. It’s very relevant
to you guys as it’s a community app for everyone who is interested in DIY, 3D printing, technology
and electronics etc. You can discuss ideas and collaborate, vote on your favourite builds
and projects, and actually learn too using the Maker Catalogue, which is an incredibly
useful encyclopaedia of all things DIY. So again, it’s called Maker Amino and is available
on iOS and Android. I hope I see you over there!
Right, so the first thing we’ll work on is the base. You can use a variety of different
materials for this, and in my case I’m using a piece of 12mm thick oak.
To cut out the base we’ll need a special hole cutter bit. This can be adjusted to cut a
circle with a size of your choosing, and is pretty inexpensive.
Once you’re about half way through the wood, flip it over and begin cutting from the other
side. This gives you a cleaner cut, though it’s still pretty jaggy so we need to give
it a sanding down. To do this we’ll get a bolt that fits perfectly
inside the central hole, and then clamp it in place with a nut and washer. We can now
lock this into a drill and spin it over some sandpaper until it’s perfectly smooth. If
you give it some time it can look really good. Now what we need to do is get a bit that matches
the size of the potentiometer we’ll be using, which in most cases should be 18mm. This potentiometer
by the way is what actually adjusts the volume, and I’ll be covering it in more detail in
a sec. This bit can then be used to expand the central
hole to make room for the potentiometer’s body. However, as there are pins to one side,
we need to use a coping saw to make room for them. After you’ve done this, the potentiometer
should now fit snugly inside the base. All we’ve got to do now is cut a grove for
the wires to be threaded through later. The easiest way to do this is to use the coping
saw to cut completely through. However, as my oak platform is thick enough, I thought
I’d use the opportunity to try using a router., which is a tool I’ve actually not used that
much. This is just a cheap one that I’m borrowing, so should represent what you guys can also
do at home. After securing my base in place using the
wood it was cut from and some double sided tape, the first step was to adjust the height
of the bit so that it protruded about a millimetre. I then carefully slid the bit between my marks,
with the router faithfully carving it out for me.
The bit was then lowered another millimetre, and the cut deepened a little more. This was
repeated until it was 6mm deep. So, whether you use a router or just use a
coping saw, the base should now be complete. One thing we’ll do before we move on however
is place it upside down onto a piece of thin cardboard and mark and cut out an identical
shape, with a rough hole in the middle. This will be later used as a spacer when it’s time
to add the concrete. Now we can start working on wiring it up,
which brings us back to the potentiometer. As audio is usually stereo, we’ll need one
that is dual gang, meaning that there are two stacked potentiometers in a single unit.
It also needs to be linear, rather than logarithmic, and have a value of 500ohms. As these are
a little tricky to find, I’ve placed links to a suitable one in the description.
Now, to transport the audio signal we’ll need a USB cable. It doesn’t really matter what
connection it has on either end, as these need to be chopped off so we can access the
wires inside, but the fact that USB cables have 5 individual wires makes them perfect
for this project as we need to transport the audio both TO and FROM the volume knob.
So, after trimming the wires we need to group them into two sets so that we wire them up
correctly later. Here I’m grouping white with red for one audio
channel, and black with green for the other audio channel. The ground wire can be just
left on its own. These are now ready to solder to the potentiometer.
With the shaft facing upwards, the rightmost pin is the audio input, the middle pin is
the audio output, and the pin on the left is the ground.
This applies to the bottom set as well, only they’re on a separate circuit.
So we’ll solder the first set of wires to the top most pins, with red on the input,
and white on the output. We can do the same for the bottom pins, only
this time using the black wire on the input, and the green wire on the output.
The ground wire can then be soldered to both the top and bottom pins on the left.
With that wired up we can now add the audio connectors, but before we do we can decorate
the wire with some braided sheathing. This stuff is really inexpensive and is available
in a variety of different colours. I’m going to go with a muted yellow to be somewhat colour
coordinated with the base, but you can go with anything you like.
To fit it over the cable we’ll first chop off the other end and then feed it all the
way along the wire until it’s about 2cm away from the potentiometer.
We can then chop off any excess from the other end. As this sheathing is liable to fray however,
we need to seal it by melting it slightly with a match. Now we can shift it down to
reveal the wire a little, pushing it right up to the potentiometer on the other side
in the process. Now we can slide on some heatshrink to use
later – don’t forget to do this at this stage because we can’t add it after we’ve soldered
on the connectors. Now we can separate the individual wires into
the same grouping we used earlier, so white with red and black with green.
As you can see I’ve cut the white and green wires slightly shorter to help avoid short
circuits with their adjacent pair. Now we need to get a headphone extension cable.
It doesn’t need to be long, but I do recommend going for something of reasonable quality
because cheap ones tend to break quite easily. So, after chopping it exactly in half, we’ll
get the male connector and expose its wires. These can then be soldered to the red and
black wires, which, if you remember, are the wires we soldered to the input pins on the
potentiometer. Once that’s done we can get the female connector
and solder this one to the white and green wires instead, which this time go to the output
pins on the potentiometer. When you do this, make sure you solder the
same colour wires of the headphone extender to the USB wire sets, so that the audio channels
don’t get flipped. As you can see, because the wires are at slightly
different lengths it’s impossible for them to touch and short out. So, after wrapping
them each in electrical tape, the last thing to do is connect all of the ground wires together.
This too can have electrical tape wrapped around it, and then we can slide up the heatshrink
we added earlier and carefully use a match to shrink it around the cables.
Once that’s done the potentiometer can be glued inside the base using some epoxy. When
you do this, make sure that there’s no chance of the glue to entering the small gaps in
the sides of the potentiometer, which would damage it, and also that the shaft is perfectly
vertical whilst it sets. Once it has set it’s time to add the concrete,
which is where this build gets particularly fun.
The first thing we can do is can add our cardboard spacer and then wrap the whole thing in cling
film to stop any moisture from reaching the wood.
Now we can mould some blue tack around the potentiometer’s shaft so that, again, moisture
is prevented from seeping down inside. Once that’s done we can get some thin flexible
plastic, like a piece of laminated paper or something from product packaging, and stick
it to the perimeter of the base using some tape, which gives us a mould into which we
can add the concrete. For this we’ll need some sand, cement, and
a container to mix it all in. We’ll do a two to one mix, so for every two spoons of sand
we use, we can add one spoon of cement. As we don’t need that much of it, eight spoons
of sand and four spoons of cement should do the trick.
Once it’s all mixed together we can begin adding the water. Be very careful with this
as it doesn’t want to be too sloppy. Try and get it to the consistency shown here.
It’s important that the mould remains perfectly level whilst the cement dries, so we’ll put
it on top of a cup so that the cling film doesn’t get in the way.
The cement can now be added, using a spoon to prod it into the corners, and you need
to add enough so that it comfortably covers the potentiometer shaft.
Now we can give it a bit of a tap to level it off. As the plastic might not be keeping
perfectly circular however, you may want to insert a disc that’s same size as the base
to keep it in line. Here I used a base from a previous attempt.
Optionally, if you’d like the top to have a super smooth finish, you can place another
piece of plastic down on top of it whilst it dries.
The difference this makes is quite significant to the final look, as it can trap air bubbles
and make it look more interesting. Without the plastic, it looks more like stone, so
just choose the style you prefer. Either way, once it’s set we can peel back
the plastic to reveal its sides. Now we can carefully pull it off as we’ve still got to
remove blue tack from the bottom, and the cling film and washer from the base.
Now we can glue the knob back in place using epoxy. However, to stop it from dripping down
the shaft and making it stiff we’ll to this upside down. Also, don’t forget to have another
piece of thin cardboard between the wood and concrete so that it dries level.
Now all that’s left to do is try it out. So we can plug the audio jack into the audio
source, in my case a computer, and then plug speakers or headphones into its audio socket.
The volume on the source can then be set to maximum, which gives us the most volume range
to work with, and it’s then ready to use. It really does work a treat, and evenly controls
the volume from minimum to maximum when used with either headphones or speakers.
Now feel free to use different materials too. You don’t have to use hardwood for the base,
for example. You could use some MDF and then paint it, for example. Or even use some plexiglass
like I did here, though you’ll need to get this one cut with a CNC router as it won’t
be that easy to get a good finish by hand. You could even add an LED for some illumination.
If you want to do this, it’s just a case of gluing an SMD LED face down, and running two
extra wires in parallel with the audio cable. The other end of these can have a resistor
added, the value of which can be calculated with an online calculator, and then they can
be soldered to the red and black wires of a spare USB cable, making sure that the polarity
is correct. When plugged in, the LED should light up whenever the computer is on.
Whatever you choose to do I hope you gave a good time building one, as it’s really fun
working with concrete like this and is great to show to your friends.
Now before I sign off, I’ve made a poll on the Maker Amino app I mentioned earlier about
which video I should make next. If you’d like to have a say, simply download the app, which
is free, and search for the term ‘diy perks’ to find the poll, and then submit your vote.
I’m pretty interested in finding out what you guys would like, so do head over there
and let me know. So that’s it for this video. I hope you’ve
enjoyed it, and as usual, don’t forget to hit that like button and maybe consider subscribing
if you haven’t already. So, other than that, I’ll see you next time! Bye for now.

How To Make a Concrete Volume Knob
Tagged on:                                                                                     

100 thoughts on “How To Make a Concrete Volume Knob

  • March 14, 2018 at 6:58 am
    Permalink

    You have a very calming voice. I shall listen to you while I try to fall asleep.

    Reply
  • March 16, 2018 at 8:07 am
    Permalink

    can I use B50K potentiometer instead of that one?

    Reply
  • March 21, 2018 at 9:17 am
    Permalink

    at first i was like "looks easy" then cement came in and was like "preety chalenging but okay" then the LED and was like "nope not gonna happen" 😂😂

    Reply
  • March 22, 2018 at 6:06 pm
    Permalink

    Add glitter or food coloring in substitute for water.

    Reply
  • April 4, 2018 at 5:34 am
    Permalink

    I found very accurate plans on the Stodoys website.

    Reply
  • April 8, 2018 at 8:55 am
    Permalink

    3:14 It looks like The uber logo

    Reply
  • April 8, 2018 at 10:12 am
    Permalink

    Extra-Tip: Use your mother’s vibrator and tip it in the cement while running. This will help the air bubbles to get driven to the surface and leave the cement

    Reply
  • April 8, 2018 at 3:25 pm
    Permalink

    I dont understand why u dont use CNC for all that cut works?… here u cut wood by hand and then the plexi with CNC, it is non sense for me… use Dxf2gcode to produce the gcode and just Autocad for the initial and general cut desing (Dxf format).

    Reply
  • April 9, 2018 at 12:40 pm
    Permalink

    Can you make a mobile phone with lots of features of your own

    Reply
  • April 15, 2018 at 5:06 am
    Permalink

    can u make a video, how to make a video forward and backward using a knob.. thanx <3

    Reply
  • April 15, 2018 at 8:06 pm
    Permalink

    soldering terrible but nice idea

    Reply
  • April 15, 2018 at 9:20 pm
    Permalink

    Didn't know the USB cable had 5 wires in them, perfect for something else i'm creating 🙂

    Reply
  • April 29, 2018 at 7:06 pm
    Permalink

    This is a great concept, though I wonder if it would be possible to adapt for balanced stereo audio?

    Reply
  • May 2, 2018 at 5:55 pm
    Permalink

    I tried this with granite left over from a slab of my kitchen counter top… looks and feels really nice, carbon fibre would also look sweet.

    Reply
  • May 6, 2018 at 9:54 am
    Permalink

    Every time he does concrete work, one thinks of: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ML8oAKlqhE

    Reply
  • May 25, 2018 at 6:33 pm
    Permalink

    What did you call that thing around the wire?

    Looks awsome, by the way!

    Reply
  • May 30, 2018 at 8:11 pm
    Permalink

    Don't let this guy's cheerful attitude fool you. You will spend hours crying trying to solder those pins together without any signal loss. Starting over many times and cutting the wires shorter and shorter while cursing.

    Reply
  • June 8, 2018 at 6:49 pm
    Permalink

    Total noob here…can I use a 1K ohm pot instead? I can't find a 500 Ohms pot

    Reply
  • June 15, 2018 at 5:56 am
    Permalink

    Very cool. Would be neat to make a large, wireless one for the coffee table.

    Reply
  • June 15, 2018 at 6:34 pm
    Permalink

    My father is a structural engineer. FINALLY! A use for all of the cellular concrete core-samples we have packed away!

    Reply
  • June 16, 2018 at 8:14 pm
    Permalink

    Hey! Great build, but you're a little wrong on the potentiometer. 500ohm pot is fine for headphones but u'll need a around 50k ohm for wiring it to a amplifier because of the lower impedance input. And when working with analouge audio (as you do there) you'll always choose a log taper potmeter instead of the linear taper one, because of the way the human perception of sound pressure 🙂

    Reply
  • June 17, 2018 at 10:50 am
    Permalink

    So this is were Microsoft got the idea for the Surface Dial

    Reply
  • June 27, 2018 at 5:30 pm
    Permalink

    This guy is obsessed with concrete

    Reply
  • June 29, 2018 at 11:19 pm
    Permalink

    I want to do something like this BUT I want it to control my Windows volume. The virtual volume.

    Reply
  • July 2, 2018 at 5:27 pm
    Permalink

    Looks like a surface dial

    Reply
  • July 7, 2018 at 7:29 am
    Permalink

    10:10 you do not want the knob to get stiff

    Reply
  • July 27, 2018 at 4:35 am
    Permalink

    You should really use some proper audio cable instead.

    Reply
  • August 6, 2018 at 7:32 am
    Permalink

    I suggest to add treble bleed circuit

    Reply
  • August 10, 2018 at 10:27 pm
    Permalink

    Use an audio potentiometer, not a linear one.

    Reply
  • August 18, 2018 at 9:23 am
    Permalink

    Would be neat if the LED indicates with the volume.

    Reply
  • August 18, 2018 at 3:29 pm
    Permalink

    Do a dyi on how to do this with an arduino board and make it adjust windows volume through usb

    Reply
  • September 10, 2018 at 10:03 am
    Permalink

    I don't know if this would work, but what if you connect the led to the input and a ground, would it work like a visualizer?

    Reply
  • September 10, 2018 at 10:41 pm
    Permalink

    Goodbye moonmen…

    Reply
  • September 21, 2018 at 11:23 pm
    Permalink

    Would it be possible to have the led get brighter when the volume increases and get darker when the volume decreases?

    Reply
  • September 24, 2018 at 9:42 pm
    Permalink

    I want to put that on my phone 🤓

    Reply
  • September 26, 2018 at 8:11 pm
    Permalink

    I'm watching this to learn how to make concrete feet for my computer case!

    Reply
  • September 29, 2018 at 8:29 am
    Permalink

    ayyyyy you have monitor audio, I got the bronze br2

    Reply
  • October 5, 2018 at 3:58 pm
    Permalink

    it will give you a "clean coot"

    Reply
  • October 10, 2018 at 9:12 pm
    Permalink

    I really like your videos.
    What I do not understand at all, is you have few videos, over many years, yet you have 1 million subscribers??

    Reply
  • October 28, 2018 at 2:06 am
    Permalink

    can a b100k version of the Potentiometer work similar.

    Reply
  • October 28, 2018 at 6:07 am
    Permalink

    The first sponsor I downloaded immediately on any video. Great integration.

    Reply
  • October 29, 2018 at 5:26 pm
    Permalink

    you could use a coping saw and a chisel to get a channel for the wires too rather than cutting it completely out

    Reply
  • November 8, 2018 at 5:30 am
    Permalink

    Sorry, audio pots are almost always logarithmic not linear.

    Reply
  • November 17, 2018 at 12:18 pm
    Permalink

    or a chisel

    Reply
  • November 22, 2018 at 4:52 pm
    Permalink

    If you're interested in a more dense surface you could use an electric toothbrush (if no other kind of vibrating device is available ATM ;o) and press it to the wooden base while filling in the cement. JFTR.

    Reply
  • November 25, 2018 at 8:13 pm
    Permalink

    Why a linear potentiometer though? Isn't our hearing logarithmic?

    Reply
  • November 27, 2018 at 8:44 am
    Permalink

    Awesome

    Reply
  • November 28, 2018 at 8:51 pm
    Permalink

    I feel a cool idea would be to hollow out the bottom somewhat and wherever there's an air bubble sop you would carve out the shape of it until it reaches the hollowed out portion then stick another LED inside and fill in the air bubble spots with some colored resign, now that would be cool ^_^

    Reply
  • December 2, 2018 at 5:36 am
    Permalink

    Make it wirelees. And bind it to a aktive speaker or pc.

    Reply
  • December 2, 2018 at 5:37 am
    Permalink

    Even Better… fabrikate it as a preamp. 😉

    Reply
  • December 11, 2018 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    why use matches instead of a lighter? 😀

    Reply
  • December 16, 2018 at 11:44 pm
    Permalink

    5000 will be enough for mp3 I think. For me it works well with 7000 for higher quality formats. IMHO

    Reply
  • December 24, 2018 at 5:44 pm
    Permalink

    Can do YouTube make the same with USB? Ich mean with USB soud because of have a USB Headset.

    Reply
  • January 9, 2019 at 4:55 pm
    Permalink

    Damn this is exactly what i need but just dont have time. damn it thats beautiful… Also you got some lovely speakers

    Reply
  • January 9, 2019 at 6:10 pm
    Permalink

    I love tge sponsor

    Reply
  • January 18, 2019 at 10:26 am
    Permalink

    i love this build, can you make it wireless via bluetooth? 🙂

    Reply
  • February 24, 2019 at 11:56 pm
    Permalink

    I recommend using resin and some cheeky leds instead of concrete

    Reply
  • March 6, 2019 at 6:28 pm
    Permalink

    Honestly look like a Echo Dot case.

    Reply
  • March 10, 2019 at 4:25 am
    Permalink

    Hi, I'm building a 2 channel 50w speaker, and was wondering what potentiometer value I should use?

    Reply
  • March 22, 2019 at 12:51 am
    Permalink

    does anyone know how to wire a headphone jack to this thing so I could have my headphone plugged in directly to the knob

    Reply
  • March 23, 2019 at 12:37 am
    Permalink

    The original microsoft surface knob

    Reply
  • April 5, 2019 at 6:00 am
    Permalink

    I know this is a fairly old video, but I have two questions. Would this still work if you plugged it into a bluetooth audio adapter and if not, is there a way to use multiple devices with this at the same time?

    Reply
  • April 6, 2019 at 8:55 am
    Permalink

    So was positive speaker input and negative output?

    Reply
  • April 6, 2019 at 8:59 am
    Permalink

    What is the most power you can leave running through the pot without risk?

    Reply
  • April 10, 2019 at 12:28 am
    Permalink

    ©

    Reply
  • May 23, 2019 at 3:15 pm
    Permalink

    His voice is so soothing! … i can listen to it all day whilst learning some great stuff i will never actually do. Okay confession i did try out the PC DIY and its cool stuff

    Reply
  • June 5, 2019 at 1:13 pm
    Permalink

    Thats Reall DIY Perks

    Reply
  • June 10, 2019 at 1:20 pm
    Permalink

    Very nice and structured way of explanations. The result was awesome 😁👍

    Reply
  • June 15, 2019 at 10:14 am
    Permalink

    I appreciate the 60FPS video. Looks so much more smooth and pleasant on my computer monitor.
    Also, how do you avoid the stereo balance issues on these designs? I've seen manufactured units that cause the balance to shift as the volume changes. How do you select the potentiometer so this effect does not happen?
    Still a great video and was so much more pleasant to watch than similar videos thanks to the higher frame rate.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 7:37 am
    Permalink

    What's that elevator music song called? Lol

    Reply
  • July 27, 2019 at 1:04 am
    Permalink

    If you want more communities, download the base Amino app (aminoapps.com).

    Reply
  • July 27, 2019 at 11:46 pm
    Permalink

    wow ! how bendy are your thumbs !

    Reply
  • July 28, 2019 at 10:56 pm
    Permalink

    USB cables have 4 wires not 5 black is ground and the exposed wire is not in every usb cable only high end data cables it's used to pass current through better. And Instead of using a USB cable you could just use an audio jack cable straight away. Instead of ugly electrical wire just use heat shrink straight away

    Reply
  • August 4, 2019 at 1:58 am
    Permalink

    Any Smaller

    Reply
  • August 8, 2019 at 7:08 am
    Permalink

    I like it but I'd recommend a further iteration that uses an Arduino to send volume up and volume down keys like a keyboard so that your system may control the volume.

    Reply
  • August 9, 2019 at 11:30 am
    Permalink

    Who is watching this in 2019?😂

    Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 6:59 pm
    Permalink

    The background music is LOCAL 58

    Reply
  • August 17, 2019 at 8:38 am
    Permalink

    That is a lot of weight on a very cheap pot.I would worry about longevity

    Reply
  • August 19, 2019 at 8:09 am
    Permalink

    3:10 MY OCD AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

    Reply
  • August 22, 2019 at 7:23 am
    Permalink

    Led? https://youtu.be/J7TYow9Qkzk

    Reply
  • August 22, 2019 at 10:54 am
    Permalink

    I think it would have been much better and easier if you used Arduino and just lower/higher the volume of the computer by twisting the knob.

    Reply
  • August 22, 2019 at 11:06 am
    Permalink

    I Know why they call the plug a male kind and the socket a female kind :)means

    Sex O.o

    Reply
  • August 23, 2019 at 3:26 am
    Permalink

    I never comment, but this is great.

    Reply
  • August 23, 2019 at 8:57 pm
    Permalink

    atleast hide the wire under the table, or make it bluetooth or wirelss with nano receiver. ALLE CORDS AND WIRES LOOK UGLY AND ANCIENT!

    Reply
  • August 23, 2019 at 11:49 pm
    Permalink

    Would it be better to use the signal from the potentiometer to go into a class a and b amplifier meaning it would limit the volume.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 8:13 pm
    Permalink

    Aw I thought it was for a guitar

    Reply
  • August 29, 2019 at 5:03 am
    Permalink

    What's next? Concrete headphones?😂

    Reply
  • August 29, 2019 at 4:18 pm
    Permalink

    Pretty cool but your soldering can be improved and pleasr. Please insulate your wires seperatly.

    Reply
  • September 2, 2019 at 3:43 pm
    Permalink

    I made it 👋👋

    Reply
  • September 16, 2019 at 3:45 pm
    Permalink

    2:30 did u Photoshop that cut, lmaoo

    Reply
  • September 20, 2019 at 11:44 am
    Permalink

    uglyest thing ever seen

    Reply
  • September 22, 2019 at 2:52 pm
    Permalink

    Your video is very inspirational for us.

    Reply
  • September 25, 2019 at 2:23 am
    Permalink

    The top looks like the moon just flat

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 6:43 pm
    Permalink

    I love you Matt

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 12:59 am
    Permalink

    I want to make one now

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 3:27 am
    Permalink

    i want to do this on my audio interface but i cant take the knob itself

    Reply
  • October 2, 2019 at 12:17 pm
    Permalink

    Good job! You should do a follow up on this one with a volume knob that spins indefinitely and is connected via USB, so that the volume control is software controlled and therefore not limiting like the potentiometer is. 🙂
    I think this would be even more appealing for people to build. ☺️

    Reply
  • November 3, 2019 at 1:44 am
    Permalink

    1. This type of potentiometer is not the best choice of this build, even using the type with double gain.
    As mentioned by others, you really SHOULD be using a logarithmic potentiometer. Yes, the linear pots work "fine" but Im sure you notice, as you get above "half" on the pot you arent really at "half volume" yet.
    2. Same DIY build >>> Arduino + Rotary Encoder. The advantage here is that negative side of using linear potentiometer exampled above is not present, and also important it show the volume level on the PC screen.
    https://learn.adafruit.com/pro-trinket-rotary-encoder/example-rotary-encoder-volume-control

    3. Esay verson of Rotary Encoder Volume Control:
    https://www.instructables.com/id/Digispark-Volume-Control/
    or
    https://www.instructables.com/id/USB-Volume-Controller-Potentiometer-Based/

    4. Same build, but here with RGB feature!! pretty cool, Mat should have opted for this one, as we all know he is capable of great builds and he loves Leds/RGB.
    http://dangerousprototypes.com/forum/index.php?topic=7654.0#p62863

    5. Ultimate build, which is WIRELESS!!!
    http://patrickmccabemakes.com/hardware/Dial/

    6. Easy method that do not require any build/DIY, and very great option, for those who is not into DIY and like a neat Desk, as less device as possible: Great soft, which REALLY should be checked!!
    https://www.nirsoft.net/utils/volumouse.html
    PS/ my Config: When Alt Key Pressed + Mouse Wheel
    When Mouse is above TaskBar , to be able to change Volume with only one hand 😉

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *