Alrighty, today to my delight, we have a nice
and easy build in this cute little box, courtesy of my mate Kodazzle, courtesy of his mate
Goddream. And this is the Tentaku mechanical calculator
from A&N Laboratory in Japan. So we get all our little hardware pieces which
includes stabilisers, feet, standoffs, and screws. And here’s the actual thing. And you can pretty much see how it all goes
together with 3 acrylic pieces and the actual unit. The reason why I was so delighted with building
this, besides the whole cool factor, was that there’s absolutely minimal soldering work
needed. Everything is soldered on, besides the keyswitches. Normally for these sorts of things, you’d
expect to have to solder on most of the parts, but we’ll get back to that. Here’s the acrylic pieces, with the base,
plate, and cover for all the components at the top. Acrylic is especially useful for DIY kits
like this. Nice and cheap, and gets the job done. Having a closer look at the PCB and the components. There’s only the standard numpad layout,
so completely fixed, and it supports MX style keyswitches, which you will have to supply
yourself, as the kit doesn’t come with any. Then everything else is up top. Here are the LED display thingos, in which
there are 2 side by side. Quite big things actually, nice and thick. I did a quick Google on these and didn’t
find them, because I’m hoping they cost a little bit to justify the price. And on the right-hand side we have our on
and off switch, very basic. And on top is our slot for a AAA battery,
so yes, it is a completely independent unit. I never really show this stuff, so I might
as well now. Bandaid mod just because. Not necessary at all, just gives that extra
little bit of softness for the bottom out on the stabilised keys. And these are just fabric bandaids cut up. The included stabs are standard Cherry clip
ins. It’s actually been quite a while since I’ve
used clips in, rather than screw ins. And actually clipping the stabs in fact, as
most modern ones come pre-clipped. And as always, lube your stabs. I went pretty heavy here with some dielectric
grease. I was given some Gateron Browns, so a light
tactile keyswitch. And I decided to lube them with Christo MCG
111. And this is the only part where you actually
have to solder, so you will need an iron to do this. But it’s super beginner friendly for soldering. 2 pins for each keyswitch, and that’s it. I did make this more complicated for myself
though, like the absolute novice that I am. These switches were kind of loose in the 1.5mm
acrylic plate, so everytime I put a new keyswitch in, the plate would go down. So then I decided to put the whole thing together,
to hold the plate up, and you’ll see why that makes completely 0 sense. And clearly I didn’t read the instructions,
in which they do have a PDF of, and even a build guide video. And this worked really well for putting in
the keyswitches. But yeh. Now you can’t solder. And because of that, I decided that actually
we needed some clicky switches in here. It’s a novelty product, and you’ll be
showing people, so you definitely need a few clickies, and I went with Kailh Box Whites. In the guide they do say to put the switches
into the plate first, which makes complete sense. Being quite flexible though, the switches
do easily pop out. Honestly, if you haven’t soldered before,
give it a go. It’s easy as, and is just a really useful
skill and tool to have in life. This however is as easy and as basic as it
gets, making a really cool DIY gift for beginners. I ended up going with GMK Minimal, thanks
again Jono. Although I was given SA Miami nights, but
I felt something shorter was better suited, and because of the translucent black acrylic
on top, I think the black and white theme is super classy. And yet another mistake from not reading the
instructions. There’s a proper direction the black acrylic
piece needs to go, as it was hitting the keycaps. Before I turn it on. The plate and base were clear, and I wasn’t
liking the look, especially with this black and white aesthetic I have going on. I took a real gamble here and decided to colour
in the sides with a Sharpie, including the PCB. So so cool. The good news is, is that after soldering,
literally all you need to do is to switch it on, and it works. No flashing or configuring or anything. It just works straight away. And well, that’s because it really is JUST
a calculator. It’s not programmable, you can’t plug
it into a computer, so it’s not a numpad, sooo yeh very much more of a novelty thing,
again a perfect gift for a tinkerer in which this actually was. But I love it. And I think the black acrylic sides do look
especially aesthetic. With GMK Minimal on top, it looks super classy,
but mixed with the super DIY look with the acrylic and open sides, so we can see all
the components, it makes for an unexpected match in my opinion. Although the gamble didn’t fully pay off,
as the Sharpie does come off a little bit on the fingers. The numbers are nice and bright. Really bright actually which looks perfect
under the translucent black acrylic. So actually using it. Num lock is the clear button, enter is equals,
and then everything else is as labelled. It can handle up to just 6 digits. So we can only input that many, and it can
only output that many. So if we do say 500k plus 600k to make 7 digits,
it comes up with error. Very very basic, but I’m totally cool with
that. I do have a Ducky Pocket which is like the
legit version. Works independently with a battery, but can
also plug into a computer and be used as a numpad. And of course comes in a complete package
with switches, keycaps, RGB backlighting, etc etc. But in a weird sort of way, if I came across
these in a store, I’d get the Tentaku just because it’s cooler and you get to build
it. I have a mix of lubed Gat Browns and Kailh
Box Whites. I lubed both the stabs and the Browns pretty
heavily, so they ended up being pretty quiet, which is the opposite to the Box Whites. And even more so, because check out this mad
flex. Nice soft bottom out, no need for any other
dampening. The kicker though is that it’s listed at
5500 Yen online, which is like 50USD. This was picked up in Japan though, so I don’t
know how much it was there. But a Ducky Pocket is like 70USD. So it is pretty pricey, especially since it
is very basic being just a calculator, and adding in switches and keycaps will increase
that. Ignore the fact that I used GMK keycaps on
here, which makes this quite the unit. But it is what it is. I really loved how it turned out. It really is very aesthetically pleasing to
me with the raw but classy look. It’s extremely beginner friendly for soldering
work. You just chuck in the switches, solder, turn
it on, and it’s all good. So disregarding the price, this is legitimately
one of my favourites builds I’ve done, ever. So if you’re looking for something fun,
possibly for someone else, especially for mech people, I think this is awesome.

Building a Mechanical Switch CALCULATOR! – TENTAKU DIY Kit
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85 thoughts on “Building a Mechanical Switch CALCULATOR! – TENTAKU DIY Kit

  • January 11, 2020 at 5:07 pm
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    First.

    Nice vid.

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 5:19 pm
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    If someone happens to actually get this, don't use this video as a guide lol.

    This is better : https://booth.pm/ja/items/1069765

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:16 pm
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    Woah, I've never been this early 😮 is this how it feels like?

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:16 pm
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    Still waiting for that video, if there is one, for the perfectly fine non-dented 65% that you fixed up on your instagram

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:17 pm
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    always wanted to do mechanical calculator

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:17 pm
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    Where’d you get that blueprint desk mat? It looks really nice

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:17 pm
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    I see you watching Anakin vs Obi Wan at 11:32

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:21 pm
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    I’ve wanted this for years

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:22 pm
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    Not actual mechanical calculator

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:29 pm
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    He was watching star wars

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:31 pm
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    imagine working in finance and keys starts to chatter

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:31 pm
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    Do the stabs feel mushy or no

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:33 pm
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    Dang I'm early 😲

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:34 pm
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    I like that it has screen

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:34 pm
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    Like if you agree

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:38 pm
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    Cool little project, though pricey. I like the bandage bumper idea.

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:43 pm
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    What was the case you used to hold your GMK minimal set?

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:43 pm
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    Does it have an auto shut off and memory feature?
    As in, does it turn off by itself after x minutes and turn back on to the last number it was on?

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:49 pm
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    Imagine this but a scientific calculator that would be epic lel

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 7:57 pm
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    130065😂😂😂 Personally, I prefer 80085.

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 8:14 pm
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    if i went to class with that with cherry blues, my teacher would kill me

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 8:16 pm
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    Omg calculator with no % is kind useless nowadays 🙁

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 8:22 pm
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    That’s sick bro

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 8:26 pm
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    Really like that. Now, just need a programmable RPN version 🙂

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 8:35 pm
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    When a mechanical calculator is more than a normal mechanical keyboard

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 8:47 pm
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    Can you build a cherry MX silver the fight stick please reply and I'll send you the ingredients if so

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 8:54 pm
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    I need one. I wish it was available in USB as well to use as a separate 10-key.

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 8:58 pm
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    Do not like it, is looks like a total cheap junk assembly.

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 9:03 pm
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    Tae here with another video to show off muh impressive soldering skills jk

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 9:06 pm
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    Now take this to class with some kailh box white switches

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 9:07 pm
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    is nobody going to talk about how the two screens are misaligned? really?
    it's very badly made for the price

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 9:23 pm
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    jee envy miami nights :v

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 9:38 pm
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    No one:

    2020: calculator asmr

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 9:41 pm
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    The Star Wars on the phone bruh

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 10:01 pm
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    Another quality video, love the chill lounge music during B-Roll assembly. Looking forward to the next one!

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 10:13 pm
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    AHHH I'VE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS KIND OF CONTENT

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 10:16 pm
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    this is getting out of hand

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 10:21 pm
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    Does anyone know if there is a scientific version

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 10:39 pm
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    This is what humanity has become. OK GOD, ARE YOU ENTERTAINED NOW?

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 11:00 pm
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    I had subbed to you a while ago and lost a fair bit of interest in mechanical keyboards over that course of time, and so I stopped watching almost every one of your videos. This one made me watch it when I saw it, and this video is great. I love that calculator, personally I think it looks way better than the Ducky, and it’s pretty awesome. Maybe I’ll get this and build one for my birthday, it seems like a good thing to do as a first project to get into mechanical keyboards. Thanks for making this video 🙂

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 11:04 pm
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    Looks Dope!! are their any more functional calculators like this? + – Tax features?

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 11:17 pm
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    This video was almost unwatchable, you really need to rotate that cutting mat 😣

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 11:18 pm
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    the box whites are legit a perfect fit for it

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 11:19 pm
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    i forgot how much i love kailh box switches

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 11:29 pm
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    causally watching revenge of the sith 11:20

    Reply
  • January 11, 2020 at 11:35 pm
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    i can’t sOlDEr

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 12:01 am
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    130065

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 12:22 am
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    Now u can cheat on ur math exam and everyone will think you know morse code 👍🏻

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 12:52 am
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    Me: (God I need to edit a new video for YT)

    YouTube: HeY wAnNa sEe A dUdE buIlD a CalCuLAToR?!??!?!?!

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 1:22 am
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    Where in Japan did you pick this up, im visiting pretty soon.

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 1:33 am
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    Considering this is from a japanese company, the limit on the numbers pretty much make it almost useless for counting japanese yen.

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 1:42 am
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    tae be typing them 130065 lol

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 1:44 am
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    …but why?

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 2:01 am
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    0:08 obligatory "zomg teh rei"

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 2:40 am
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    6 digits only? Can't input 5318008 then 🙁
    The aesthetic of this Tentaku kit is on point (esp that thicc LED display) , but I do prefer the versatility and features of the Ducky Pocket that lets you use it as both as a numpad and detachable calculator. If only there was a product that cross pollinated the best of both.

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 3:15 am
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    This is the nerdiest way to pull up to class lmaooo

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 3:17 am
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    I live in Australia and where do you get dielectric grease, I can’t find them anywhere

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 4:33 am
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    but this is just a regular calculator with mechanical switches, not a MECHANICAL CALCULATOR!

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 5:00 am
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    It bugs me that the LCD on the left is higher 🤪

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 5:29 am
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    box whites are so satisfying

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 7:08 am
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    Cool calculator. Thank you for not having too much background music in this video

    Edit: spoke a little too soon

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 7:32 am
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    lmao good ol process of elimination build guide

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 9:10 am
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    very nice display, looks just like the VFDs on old test gear

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 11:02 am
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    link for the blue screwdriver?

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 11:22 am
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    Imagine having this with MX Blues on your exam.

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 11:44 am
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    could you please link a video which is good for showing installation of screw in and clip in stabilizers? My current stabilizers are awful and I want to know how difficult it would be to swap them. Thanks.

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 1:13 pm
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    This is COOL

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 1:41 pm
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    Rgb calculator

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 3:47 pm
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    wish i could get one!

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 5:59 pm
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    This is your daily dose of Recommendation

    Not ancient calculator! It's a mechanical key calculator. Mechanical keyboard key

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 6:24 pm
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    that's not a mechanical calculator https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDn_DDsBWws

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 7:04 pm
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    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanical_calculator

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 7:15 pm
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    Who else is disappointed that he didn't spell 8008135

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 7:25 pm
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    could you do something with numpads next? thinking of getting one for macros to supplement a 60%

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 7:40 pm
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    Make it RGB!!!

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 7:45 pm
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    is there a link that is for the us

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 9:09 pm
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    ah I see you're a mathematician of culture

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 9:38 pm
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    What I learned from this video:
    1. RTFM
    2. I need this sort of calculator in my life
    3. RTFM
    4. Black and white aesthetic is awesome
    5. RTFM
    6. Acrylic could be used as a backplate (although I wonder how well that would hold up for a full keyboard)

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 9:55 pm
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    DSA Scientific caps are an absolute must on this

    Reply
  • January 12, 2020 at 10:02 pm
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    What keycaps did u use

    Reply
  • January 13, 2020 at 2:38 am
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    i usually type 8008135 to test the reliability

    Reply
  • January 13, 2020 at 3:50 am
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    Brain: its three am, just go to bed

    TaeKeyboards: MECHANICAL SWITCH CALCULATOR!

    Reply
  • January 13, 2020 at 6:41 am
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    A gamer would pay money for a mechanical switch anything

    Reply

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