Hey guys, Jarrod here and today we’re going
to compare 16 older and cheaper Xeon CPU cores against AMD’s Threadripper to see how much
difference there is, and if you should consider building a system with used second hand Xeon
processors instead. If you’ve been following the channel you
would have seen the 16 CPU core server that I built, using two 8 core Intel E5-2670 Xeon
CPUs as these are fairly cheap and could be bought second hand for around $50 USD when
I picked mine up. I recently upgraded to an AMD 1950X Threadipper
workstation which also has 16 CPU cores, and I was interested to see how it would compare.
The Xeons are from 2012 while the Threadripper CPU is from 2017, so 5 years difference between
them. Both systems are running with 64GB of RAM,
although the Threadripper system is running DDR4 at 2,666MHz, while the Xeon system is
running DDR3 at 1,333MHz. Both systems are running Windows 10 pro for the OS with all
available updates installed. As I’m testing these from the perspective of being a productivity
workstation or server, I haven’t included overclocking results for the 1950X or performed
any gaming tests as they don’t really make sense here. Of course we expect the 1950X to win as it’s
quite a bit newer, but by how much? And are the cheaper options still worth considering
with all these new choices? Let’s take a look at the benchmarks and
find out! Starting with Cinebench we can see that in
single core the 1950X is a fair amount in front. Although you can get much better single
core performance with consumer grade Intel chips this was still important to test. The multicore results are where these two
high core count systems shine, with the 1950X still a fair amount ahead of the Xeon system. The Passmark 9 single core results show slightly
less difference between the two, with the multicore results telling a similar story
around the 30% difference mark. Looking at the single core results in Geekbench
4 shows the 1950X doing much better when compared with the Cinebench test, over 70% better in
the single core results. Swapping over to the multicore result brings things a little
closer together though with just a 40% difference, so it would seem that something in this particular
test favours the Threadripper chip for single core performance. I’ve used the 7-Zip benchmark with a 32mb
dictionary size to test compression and decompression, and we can see that the compression speeds
aren’t actually that far apart, however the 1950X is quite far ahead when it comes
to decompression tasks. VeraCrypt was used to test encryption and
decryption speeds. With a 1GB buffer size we can see that the 1950x is performing quite
a lot faster than the two Xeon CPUs, around 67% better. The Corona 1.3 benchmark renders a scene using
CPU power only, in this test we can see that the 1950X completed the task faster, around
36% quicker, only less than half a minute faster. Now let’s take a look at some video encoding,
with Handbrake I’ve encoded a 1080p h.264 video file to 720p, and we can see the 1950X
was a fair bit faster. If you had a lot of footage over time it would add up to quite
a big difference. In Adobe Premiere I’ve rendered my review
video on the ASUS Zephyrus gaming laptop, which goes for around 10 minutes at 1080p.
No GPUs were in use for the test, these results are CPU tests only. We can see that the 1950X
completed the same task more than 5 minutes faster which is around 34% quicker, again
this would start to add up if you did this regularly and would be even larger with 4K
footage. Raw performance isn’t the only important
factor, what about power usage? Well it’s not so great for the older Xeons here either,
drawing over 100 watts more when maxed out, and around 40 at idle, so you’ll be paying
more to run the older system. From the results we can clearly see the 1950X
is winning in every test as should be expected, it’s a 5 year newer CPU and is more expensive.
On average the 1950X is performing 44% better than the two E5-2670 CPUs, not bad at all.
Let’s talk about cost for a bit, the 1950X is currently $999 USD at the time of recording,
while I saw the two E5-2670 CPUs available second hand for about $50 USD each on Ebay
when I bought them, however they appear to have gone up a little in price lately due
to lower supply. The cheapest Threadripper motherboard at the
time of recording goes for about $339 USD, however the dual socket xeon boards even second
hand can cost anywhere from $300 to $600 USD, they’re quite expensive for old used boards
and can be difficult to find. As I mentioned in my server build video I was lucky to get
them as a combo so I saved some money there. Unless you can get a really cheap motherboard,
I find it difficult to recommend building a dual Xeon 2670 system, as AMD’s Threadripper
is a much newer platform in comparison, although this comes at an increased cost. Although
the extra performance is nice to have, even in multicore applications the Xeons still
did a pretty good job, however the single core results are a little low making them
difficult to recommend unless you’re only using them for multicore workloads. So which of these options would you pick for
a home server or workstation? To be honest I don’t really have a huge need for the
server anymore, as the desktop has more than enough processing power for what I do. With
that said it’s good that there are still somewhat budget friendly compute options available
to get heaps of cores. Be sure to let me know your thoughts down in the comments, and leave
a like on the video if you found the information useful. Thanks for watching, and don’t forget
to subscribe for future tech videos like this one.

16 CPU Core Comparison – AMD 1950X Threadripper vs 2x Intel Xeon E5-2670
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52 thoughts on “16 CPU Core Comparison – AMD 1950X Threadripper vs 2x Intel Xeon E5-2670

  • November 11, 2017 at 9:23 pm
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    Thanks for the video, my used Supermicro Server came yesterday, what do you think about an upgrade to ivy bridge xeons such as the Xeon E5-2670/2680 v2?
    I see most of the Socket 2011 MBs such as mine support these with new BIOSes.

    Reply
  • November 11, 2017 at 9:34 pm
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    Beneficial video as always.

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  • November 11, 2017 at 10:29 pm
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    and where does someone get those cpus for $50?

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  • November 11, 2017 at 11:45 pm
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    That thumbnail shot is absurdly nice.

    Reply
  • November 13, 2017 at 12:21 pm
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    You're 3 subs from 5,000 and I just made you 1 closer!

    Reply
  • November 14, 2017 at 8:55 am
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    Awesome video mate. Wish I made this comparison! It was great.

    Reply
  • November 25, 2017 at 6:54 am
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    great videos of course steve was right

    Reply
  • November 30, 2017 at 2:40 am
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    what was the total cost of each system ?  what about Ram, was it ECC memory on the Dual Zeons ??

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  • November 30, 2017 at 8:02 am
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    I'd pick Threadripper. Even though it would be more expensive you'll still have several years of support with socket TR4 and a warranty for all the components that you've bought.

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  • December 5, 2017 at 10:49 am
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    what is the point to compare systems if one is 2012 and another 2017. 1950x is meant to be overclocked.

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  • December 10, 2017 at 3:09 am
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    I've also got a system with dual-2670's and these score 114 sc on cinebench. Your video shows 104 points, which is close but makes me think that you perhaps did not enable turbo boost correctly. Remember these do 3.3ghz if enabled but only 2.6ghz if not. Windows power settings also should be using the performance mode, as it also reduces performance quite a bit for these old xeons. But regardless great video.

    Reply
  • December 12, 2017 at 6:48 am
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    I chose the Threadripper 1950X hands down. Didn't even consider Xeons.

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  • December 18, 2017 at 9:36 am
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    Does it take Registered Ram DIMMs?

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  • December 20, 2017 at 12:50 am
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    At 2:04 "Geekbench 4 multi brings things a little closer with only a 40% difference". ONLY a 40% difference…. thats I don't know, kinda noticeable. You seem a bit reluctant to emphasize the HUGE performance Ryzen has here over your comparison PC. Still a good video, found this info interesting.

    Reply
  • January 15, 2018 at 10:51 am
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    I want to know if threadripper is viable using unraid.

    Reply
  • January 18, 2018 at 10:49 pm
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    I'd like to see this but using 2 E5-2680 v2 10 core's I'm willing to bet it would be a hell of a lot closer and 1/4th the price of the threadripper. I just spent 400.00 on 2 e5's and 500 on 128gb of ddr-3 ecc ram. I feel I got the better deal.

    Also I recommend upgrading your xeons to the v2 versions they are much better.

    Reply
  • February 4, 2018 at 7:14 pm
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    Author of this video, absolutely lamer of edition? Not on the cards I was to buy
    on Ali Express two E5-2680V2 processors = 20 cores40 threads for $300?

    Reply
  • February 4, 2018 at 8:37 pm
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    2x Intel Xeon E5-2670 = 200$
    AMD 1950X Threadripper = 1000$

    Reply
  • February 7, 2018 at 7:20 am
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    I'm seeing dual socket LGA2011 motherboards on eBay from $90-200. Where'd you get $300-600?

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  • February 21, 2018 at 6:57 pm
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    I haven´t seen 2670 for 50US in the last months! I really don´t know hwy so many people tell these are available for that price. In Europe these are more like 100-150$, global prices dont vary much, due to almost zero shipping costs.
    Does´t chance toooo much though in price comparisons. A pair of XEON 2670 are still under 300$.

    Reply
  • March 7, 2018 at 12:36 pm
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    Are you selling this Since you don’t need it anymore

    Reply
  • March 7, 2018 at 8:10 pm
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    I realize you didn't have the fastest E5-26xx V1 series chip available for testing, but since the 1950X is the fastest in the Threadripper series that would have been more interesting to see. Maybe two e5-2689w or two e5-2690 would be more comparable. Still a very nice video comparison!

    Reply
  • March 21, 2018 at 7:31 am
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    Excellent comparisons, I have 4 Xeons 1 & 2 series as blade/rack servers I was thinking of putting back into action. Since the power consumption was worrying me and the cost of internet access is high I couldn't decide?
    I now think I may be better off investing in the AMD 1950X or 7-1800X and I might even wait until new series comes next month!

    Reply
  • March 25, 2018 at 6:27 am
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    It's Faster, Not "Fast-ah". Also… Not "Fact-Uh", either. UGGGH!!!

    Reply
  • March 26, 2018 at 1:50 am
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    is having 64gb of RAM better than 32gb? Would computer run faster with 64gb or there is no difference?

    Reply
  • April 1, 2018 at 1:39 am
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    The Threadripper is simply overpriced for what little gains you can obtain. I'd rather use the extra 800 bucks for many other things and probably still be under the price of Threadripper and MB alone. Simple math 999 + 340 + 450 (DDR4 Memory) and I have to say you're almost at 2k and for the same Money I can invest in Dual Xeon's + MB + Memory + GTX 1080 Ti + SSD's + Case + PSU and probably a new install of Windows 10 Pro… Threadripper is just not worth the change over… When Threadripper drops to under 500 bucks maybe then but now, nope too expensive…

    Reply
  • April 4, 2018 at 9:30 pm
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    I think that comparing those CPUs is not usual, but it's my opinion. Maybe you have to compare the ryzen 19xx series with the i9 or the i7.
    You're comparing a almost 6 yrs old CPU with a brand new one, then, one is a 10 core the other 12 or more. Not talk about working frequencys.
    Manufacturing process for the Xeon is 32 Nm and for the ripper 14 also xeon at least have 10/12 Mb L3 cache less.
    From my opinion, considering the fact that the Xeon is 6 years older, and the same 2670v4 has doubled the performance, you should rethink a little of your consideration. I've a WS with 2 e5-2670v3, and the ryzen is far far away from them !

    Reply
  • April 13, 2018 at 9:40 pm
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    I run a similar dual xeon e5-2665 pc but plan on upgrading it to Threadripper if I can get a good price for it.
    The biggest (cost) advantage for the old xeons is the fact that you can use DDR3 RAM. You can easily get 64 GB of used DDR3 for the cost of maybe 16GB of ddr4. For high clockspeed ddr4 you pay even more.

    As said, the server boards are quite expensive and rare to find. There is an Intel server board, which often gets sold below 200 Euro, but you really notice that its a server board. Lots of gigabit lan and some USB 2.0s. Thats it. Just 2 SATA3s. And if you want to connect more than 3 drives, you can buy an Intel storage key, to use the other 8 connectors…
    x399 boards have all of that included.

    So if you need lots of ram, the dual xeon is probably the way to go on a budget. Given the recent price drops of TR I would go for it, if you dont need more than 16Gb of ram

    Reply
  • April 16, 2018 at 5:29 pm
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    I use the Xeon for a backup/server/last resort for a gaming pc. It's still a good bang for the buck if you want a cheap octi core system.

    Reply
  • April 25, 2018 at 10:55 pm
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    I bought my dual E5-2670 workstation off eBay for $1100, added a $250 RX580, and I've been happy with the performance. Only time it lags is when I'm editing 3 streams of H.264 4K video at full quality. Would be curious to know how much I'd have to spend to get that extra 44% performance boost.

    Reply
  • May 9, 2018 at 2:56 pm
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    What you didn't mention was MEMORY. The Xeons take DDR3 registered RAM, and you can stack in hundreds of GB for a reasonable cost. Threadripper demands fast DDR4, which is between 4 and 5 times the price. Getting even 128GB RAM to run on threadripper seems a challenge with a standard MB. There are server boards for Threadripper, needing DDR Registered DDR4, where you can stack up the memory, but this is another x2 in price. For a thread-hungry, and RAM-hungry system, the old Xeons still pack a punch, at a fraction of the price.

    Reply
  • May 27, 2018 at 7:01 am
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    I think the advantage of Xeons are ECC registered dimms

    Reply
  • June 1, 2018 at 7:16 am
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    If you. Want a low cost, high Power machine, don’t build your own. There are loads of Dell T5600/T510/T7600/T7610, HPZ620/Z820, Lenovo D30/C30 dual Xeon workstations that are available at under $US1K. The built in power supplies are 800W and up. You can go as high as 512 GB RAM, and the DDR3 RDIMM Ram for these units can be had pretty cheap. You do need to keep in mind that NVME storage for booting is not an option, but most of them o have on board Raid controllers. Cooling is were well designed, and these are designed for continuous, full out use. You can do as you please, but even a threadripper isn’t significantly faster than a pair of E5-2690s, in multitasking applications, and te E5-2690 v2s are even faster.

    Reply
  • June 8, 2018 at 6:34 pm
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    Bad news for INTEL AMD has the Threadripper 24 core 48 thread and the 32 core and 64 treads processors so call it quits.

    Reply
  • June 21, 2018 at 7:54 am
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    Excellent video. I can see that the winners are the Xeons. It is 10% of the cost of the AMD, yet slighter lower performance, but higher energy cost. Overall it is a clear win for Xeon E5 2670s.

    Reply
  • June 23, 2018 at 11:43 am
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    I currently run the Dual E5 2670s, but I bought them about 2 years ago

    Reply
  • July 6, 2018 at 12:39 pm
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    I got two e5 2670s, mobo, ram, PSU and chassi for $450

    Reply
  • July 16, 2018 at 9:38 pm
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    Some of these tests you're running are very dependent on RAM speed.

    Reply
  • July 30, 2018 at 3:39 am
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    Thank you so much! For weeks, I was looking for a cheap Dell T5610 to go for dual Xeons. Eventhough I knew there was going to be a efficiency and performance difference, I didn't expect it to be this significant! Opened up my eyes; I'm going for Threadripper!

    Reply
  • August 14, 2018 at 2:40 pm
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    rip XEONs

    Reply
  • October 27, 2018 at 1:11 pm
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    You can get 64gb of DDR3 RAM for about 250-300$ for your xeon workstation and maybe even change E5-2670 for something like E5- 2680 v2 and it still would be cheaper then AMD 1950X alone.
    I dont even want to know how much 64gb DDR4 RAM costs.

    Reply
  • November 21, 2018 at 9:26 am
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    Threadripper 1950X for me

    Reply
  • December 7, 2018 at 7:55 am
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    So the Xeons and a motherboard cost less than half the Threadripper alone and perform within 40% but you can't recommend them? We know who you are getting paid by.

    The Threadripper is also clocked 800 Mhz faster so there's most of the performance difference. Get faster Xeons and watch that performance disappear for a fraction of the cost.

    I'm an AMD fan but you just basically lied to your subscribers.

    Reply
  • January 5, 2019 at 7:12 pm
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    I know this is an old video, but what about a used work station instead of building with used parts? You can buy a used bare bones HP Z820 with dual E5-2670's with 32 gigs of ram and no video card for 450.00 US. ( Dual E5-2680 v2's for not much more) Add an SSD and video card and you can be WELL under 1000.00 US for the complete rig. Now it still won't hold a candle to any workstation with an AMD ryzen 7 chip much less a threadripper but it will give you a lot of punch for a lot less money invested. By the time I need to replace a used Z820, something else will be 5 to 6 years old and likely just as cheap.
    There is a lot to be said for going in either direction. Given the luxury of choice I would go with the threadripper without a thought. If you are on a tight budget, a used dual socket workstation is no slouch. You just have to know what you are giving up and be able to work around it.

    Reply
  • March 2, 2019 at 10:39 am
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    Only test that matters is corona renderer benchmark… its real speed test.
    So, dual xeon all the way.
    But Amd cpu is the beast too!!!

    Reply
  • April 6, 2019 at 8:34 am
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    what case on both of them?

    Reply
  • April 22, 2019 at 10:34 am
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    Can I get your Email so that You can guide of of how to start building your own server
    I am a newcomer that's why don't have much idea of it
    I hope you will consider my humble request
    Thank you

    Reply
  • April 22, 2019 at 11:12 am
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    How to start to build a server if you don't have any idea of what components are required, what type of hardware connections are there and what different software tools are required

    Can you please provide with a deep insight of all these because there are many who don't have idea neither they are getting an authorized guidance from anywhere
    Can you please help us?

    Reply
  • June 7, 2019 at 3:40 am
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    AMD ryzen! Do a new video on these! I'd like to build a server like yours, but using the Ryzen chips! (2019 chips)

    Reply
  • June 18, 2019 at 5:47 pm
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    What case did you use on the threadripper build?

    Reply
  • July 9, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    What is this cabinet?

    Reply

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